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Catalog Number 2016.028.001
Description Packard Bell Radio, c. 1930s. It was used by Ruth Grove and her family when they first learned about the bombing of Pearl Harbor on December 7, 1941 and for listening to subsequent Fireside Chats during World War II. This radio is rectangular in shape and is small and white with Bakelite casing surrounding the front. In the front of the radio, there are lines and curves next to each other along the plastic surface on the top, and bottom. The lines in the middle of the front of the radio are more spaced out. Inside of the middle of the radio is some brown cloth fabric that covers where the speakers comes through. Next to the speakers, there is a pale white clear screen that covers the radio dial with a display on black lines spaced out outside and connected to a white square space with sets of numbers in black and bold with small lettering from "55...170" printed next to each line. This are mostly like the channels on the radio. Within the white square space, there is some printed small black text in the middle that says "Packard Bell / hompak", with a black underline underneath "Packard Bell". Above the text in the radio dial is a metal arrow which is pointing the line with the number "110" on one end at the upper left. The metal arrow is pointing in a 45 degree angle. Below the text "Packard Bell / hompak", there is some printed small black, bold text that says "KILOCYCLES". Below the screen with the radio dial are the white knobs, which is on top of the bottom white lines along the plastic surfaces. The right knob is more round in shape with a hole directly through the side of the knob. The left knob is more curved at the top with a plastic surface, but also has the same sized hole on the side much like the right knob. At the bottom of plastic radio, there are two holes, one with a metal nail, which is more in the inside of the radio surface, and another with a metal screw landing on the outside of the radio. The sides of the radio has a flat white surface with no lines or curves. At the back of the radio, there are some black tubes with one clear tube with a black base connected to a metal surface with wires and a brown electric cord at the end. The black tube on the far left has some printed white text that says "Radiotron 6J7 / MADE IN USA". The black tube on the middle left has some printed white, and bold text that says "EN-RAD 6K7 / MADE IN USA / B-7". The clear white tube at the far right has some printed white, bold text on the tube that says "5Y3 / GT". The text "6J7", "6K7" and "5Y3 / GT" is surrounded by a white octagon shaped like a stop sign. The black base on the clear tube has some printed tiny white bold text that says "MADE IN / USA / 243". In the back of the these tubes, at the far left is the tuning gang or the tuner variable capacitor which is made of metal with a small black wire that connects to the light for the radio dial. Next to the tuner is the yellow IF transformer made of iron, which is connected to the metal tuning gang. Next to the yellow IF transformer is the speaker in brown with a metal bracket on top. In front of the back of the speaker, in silver with medium lettering, the embossed text reads "OXFORD / Trademark" with a silver circle underneath. In the front of the brown metal surface, there are two metal screws that are in cased inside the back of the radio, which is next to a off white piece of paper sticking to the back of the metal surface. The printed black and bold small text on the piece of paper reads "...NSED BY / RADIO CO...RATION OF AMERICA / "FOR RADIO AMATEUR EXPERMIENTAL AND BROADCAST RECEPTION / THE MANUFACTURE AND OR SALE OF THIS APPARTUS DOES NOT IMPLY ANY LICENSE / UNDER ANY PATENT RELATING TO THIS STRUCTURE OR MANUFACTURE OF RADIO TIMES". The text "THE MANUFACTURE AND OR SALE OF THIS APPARTUS DOES NOT IMPLY ANY LICENSE / UNDER ANY PATENT RELATING TO THIS STRUCTURE OR MANUFACTURE OF RADIO TIMES" is smaller than the rest of the text above. Below all of the text above, printed in black, bold with small lettering, the text reads "PATENTS" with several columns of numbers from "1.128.280...1.734.132". The letters on "PATENTS" is spaced out. Below the text above, printed in black, bold with small lettering, the text reads "ALSO ONE OR MORE HAZELTINE AND LATOUR PATENTS" with several columns of numbers from "1.382.738...2.016.760". On the left hand side of the piece of paper, in a circle with black with small lettering, the printed text reads "10". On the right, in a rectangular square, in bold red with medium lettering, the printed text reads "86040". On the right bottom corner of the metal surface, engraved in silver, the text reads "5 55969". The first "5" is disproportionately bigger than the rest of the numbers.
Object Name Radio, Table
Collection 3D - Telecommunication Tools & Equipment
Title Packard Bell Radio, c. 1930s
Date c. 1930s
Creator Unknown
Role Manufacturer
Inscription Text "55...170" (printed in black, bold with small lettering in a white square space with black lines on the outside)

"Packard Bell / hompak" (printed in black with small lettering within the white square space with the words "Packard Bell" underlined)

"KILOCYCLES" (printed in black, bold with small lettering within the white square space below the text "Packard Bell / hompak")

"Radiotron 6J7 / MADE IN USA" (printed in white on the far left black tube at the back of the radio with the words "6J7" in a white octagon shaped like a stop sign)

"EN-RAD 6K7 / MADE IN USA / B-7" (printed in white and bold on the middle left black tube at the back of the radio with the words "6K7" in a white octagon shaped like a stop sign)

"5Y3 / GT" (printed in white and bold in a white octagon shaped like a stop sign on the far right clear tube at the back of the radio)

"MADE IN / USA / 243" (printed in white and bold on the black base of the far right clear tube at the back of the radio)

"OXFORD / Trademark" (embossed in silver with medium lettering with a silver circle underneath
on the back with the speaker)

"...NSED BY / RADIO CO...RATION OF AMERICA / "FOR RADIO AMATEUR EXPERMIENTAL AND BROADCAST RECEPTION / THE MANUFACTURE AND OR SALE OF THIS APPARTUS DOES NOT IMPLY ANY LICENSE / UNDER ANY PATENT RELATING TO THIS STRUCTURE OR MANUFACTURE OF RADIO TIMES" (printed in black and bold with small lettering on a piece of paper on the far left hand bottom corner of the back of the radio with the text " THE MANUFACTURE AND OR SALE OF THIS APPARTUS DOES NOT IMPLY ANY LICENSE / UNDER ANY PATENT RELATING TO THIS STRUCTURE OR MANUFACTURE OF RADIO TIMES" smaller than the text above)

"PATENTS" (printed in black and bold, but spaced out with small lettering on the piece of paper on the far left hand bottom corner of the back of the radio)

"1.128.280...1.734.132" (printed in black with small lettering within several small columns underneath the text "PATENTS" on the piece of paper)

"ALSO ONE OR MORE HAZELTINE AND LATOUR PATENTS" (printed in black, bold with small lettering below the set of numbers "1.128.280...1.734.132" on the piece of paper)

"1.382.738...2.016.760" (printed in black with small lettering below the text "ALSO ONE OR MORE HAZELTINE AND LATOUR PATENTS" on the piece of paper)

"10" (printed in black, and bold with small lettering in a black circle on the left hand bottom corner of the piece of paper)

"86040" (printed red and bold with small lettering in a rectangular square at the right hand bottom corner of the piece of paper)

"5 55969" (engraved in silver at the far bottom corner of the back of the radio with the first number "5" is disproportionately bigger than the rest of the numbers in the phrase)
Provenance Packard Bell Radio used by Ruth Grove and her family when they first learned about the bombing of Pearl Harbor on December 7, 1941 and for listening to subsequent Fireside Chats during World War II.
Notes "World War II was a radio war. Sure, every American city and large town had its daily newspapers. A tide of mail flowed through the nation, many people had access to telephones, and movie showings typically included a newsreel featuring recent wartime footage. But when it came to getting the latest news, there was nothing like radio for immediacy. There was nothing like it for entertainment, either. Every day, all day, Americans could tune in to comedy, drama, and music, along with commercials for local and national services and products. Radio was WWII Americans’ connection to the nation and the world. ...

Back then, radios had tubes instead of transistors. When you turned one on, you had to wait for the tubes to warm up before you could hear anything. ... Many had wooden cabinets, and some were luxurious, waist-high consoles proudly placed in the front parlor. The family would gather around the radio in the evening for companionship and entertainment. During the frequent nighttime air-raid drills—when whole towns blacked out by extinguishing outdoor lights and minimizing indoor lighting so no light leaked through windows—listening to the radio was about the only thing there was to do until bedtime." [http://www.americainwwii.com/articles/watching-the-radio/-12/27/2016]
Dimensions H-6 W-8 inches
Search Terms Grove, Ruth
Radio
Radio Technologies
Radio Technology
Radios
War
World War II
Subjects Radio broadcasting
Radio industry
War
World War II
People Grove, Ruth