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Catalog Number 1989.420
Description Log Cabin Quilt, c. 1880-1925. Hand-pieced log cabin quilt of various materials including cotton, velvet, rayon and possibly wool in multiple colored solids and prints. Log cabin blocks are hand-pieced onto off-white cotton muslin and the blocks are machine-sewn together to form a diamond radiating out from the center. Backing is white cotton and has been affixed to top with hand-sewn whip stitches along the outer edge. Top is basted to backing along outside edges as if quilt is not yet finished. Piece is not quilted. An off-white cotton sleeve has been sewn to back top for hanging.

From the Estate of Florence Schroter Massole Cahill. Made by Carlotta Marie Bracesco, Great Grandmother of Donor and Grandmother of Florence Schroter Massole Cahill.
Object Name Quilt, Bed
Collection 3D - Bedding
Title Log Cabin Quilt, c. 1880-1925
Date c. 1880-1925
Creator Bracesco ,Carlotta Marie
Role Quiltmaker
Inscription Text none
Provenance From the Estate of Florence Schroter Massole Cahill. Made by Carlotta Marie Bracesco, Great Grandmother of Donor and Grandmother of Florence Schroter Massole Cahill.
Notes Log Cabin quilts first made a wide-spread appearance in the United States in the 1860s during the time of the Civil War. The block name may very well have had a connection to the presidency of Abraham Lincoln. The Log Cabin quilt became wildly popular and was identified with the pioneer spirit and values of America.

Early Log Cabin blocks were hand-pieced using strips of fabrics around a central square. In traditional Log Cabin blocks, one half is made of dark fabrics and the other half light. A red center symbolized the hearth of home, and a yellow center represented a welcoming light in the window. Anecdotal evidence, based on oral folklore, suggests that during the Civil War, a Log Cabin quilt with a black center hanging on a clothesline was meant to signal a stop for the Underground Railroad.

In the latter part of the nineteenth century many Log Cabin quilts were made by the foundation method with a muslin base. Wools, velvets, satins, and other nontraditional fabrics were used. Log Cabins of this period often had strips that were folded and laid down, creating a three-dimensional effect. For this reason, many late-nineteenth-century Log Cabins do not have batting, but are backed and tied like Crazy Quilts.
[http://www.quiltviews.com/log-cabin-quilts-a-short-history 10-6-2016]
Dimensions H-77 W-70.5 D-0.25 inches
Medium Textile
Search Terms Bracesco, Carlotta Marie
Cahill, Florence Schroter Massole
Quilt
Quilts
Subjects Quilting
Quilts
People Bracesco, Carlotta Marie
Cahill, Florence Schroter Massole