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Name Trans-Alaska Pipeline
Number of Archive records 2
Number of Object records 6
Number of Photo records 25

Associated Records

Image of 2017.006.001 - Raychem Trans-Alaska, c. 1975-1976. One 16mm color film with sound, approximately 500' and 13 minutes 42 seconds. The film shows the production and installation of a corrosion protection material called Arcticlad, which Raychem developed for coating pipelines during the construction of the Trans-Alaska Pipeline. The film was originally stored in a brown metal film canister, 9.5" diameter x 1" with a Raychem Corporation label covered with a business card for Rodney L. Derbyshire. A piece of broken leader stored with the film has handwritten text in black ink that reads, "Raychem Trans-Alaska."

2017.006.001 - Raychem Trans-Alaska, c. 1975-1976. One 16mm color film with sound, approximately 500' and 13 minutes 42 seconds. The film shows the production and installation of a corrosion protection material called Arcticlad, which Raychem developed for coating pipelines during the construction of the Trans-Alaska Pipeline. The film was originally stored in a brown metal film canister, 9.5" diameter x 1" with a Raychem Corporation label covered with a business card for Rodney L. Derbyshire. A piece of broken leader stored with the film has handwritten text in black ink that reads, "Raychem Trans-Alaska."

Raychem Trans-Alaska, c. 1975-1976. One 16mm color film with sound, approximately 500' and 13 minutes 42 seconds. The film shows the production and installation of a corrosion protection material called Arcticlad, which Raychem developed for coating pipelines during the construction of the Trans-Alaska Pipeline. The film was originally stored in a brown metal film canister, 9.5" diameter x 1" with a Raychem Corporation label covered with a business card for Rodney L. Derbyshire. A piece of broken leader stored with the film has handwritten text in black ink that reads, "Raychem Trans-Alaska."

Image of 2017.006.002 - Untitled (Raychem Corporation Arcticlad and Hotclad), 1978. One 16mm color film with sound, approximately 400' and 11 minutes. The first part of the film shows the production and installation of a corrosion protection material called Arcticlad, which Raychem developed for coating pipelines during the construction of the Trans-Alaska Pipeline. The second part of the film shows a similar material called Hotclad during installation at the Belridge Oil field in California and the coating operation at Ameron in California. The film was originally stored in a brown metal film canister, 7.125" diameter x 1" with the label, "Raychem Pipeline  /  Alaska - Belridge - Ameron."

2017.006.002 - Untitled (Raychem Corporation Arcticlad and Hotclad), 1978. One 16mm color film with sound, approximately 400' and 11 minutes. The first part of the film shows the production and installation of a corrosion protection material called Arcticlad, which Raychem developed for coating pipelines during the construction of the Trans-Alaska Pipeline. The second part of the film shows a similar material called Hotclad during installation at the Belridge Oil field in California and the coating operation at Ameron in California. The film was originally stored in a brown metal film canister, 7.125" diameter x 1" with the label, "Raychem Pipeline / Alaska - Belridge - Ameron."

Untitled (Raychem Corporation Arcticlad and Hotclad), 1978. One 16mm color film with sound, approximately 400' and 11 minutes. The first part of the film shows the production and installation of a corrosion protection material called Arcticlad, which Raychem developed for coating pipelines during the construction of the Trans-Alaska Pipeline. The second part of the film shows a similar material called Hotclad during installation at the Belridge Oil field in California and the coating operation at Ameron in California. The film was originally stored in a brown metal film canister, 7.125" diameter x 1" with the label, "Raychem Pipeline / Alaska - Belridge - Ameron."

Image of 2016.015.002.13 - Propane Pipe Sleeve Torch, 1975. Steel and brass propane torch. The cylindrical head of the torch is 5” long with a 1.5” diameter. The torch head has multiple air holes including four 3/8" diameter holes spaced equidistant around the circumference near the base. Six rows, each comprised of six 1/4 inch holes, appear down the length of the torch head and are spaced at 0.5” apart from each other around the circumference. The torch head is attached to 0.5” diameter metal tubing that is bent at a 30 degree angle a few inches below the head. After the bend, the tube extends for 10 inches where a brass valve is attached to regulate the flow of gas. A black sleeve of heat shrink plastic covers the lower 7.5" of tubing.
This torch was used by Jim Thompson during the Trans-Alaska Pipeline construction project. His role was to show workers how to correctly install Raychem Corporation products and teach quality control inspectors the criteria for correct installation. He notes that when in use, the torch was connected to a propane bottle with a regulator via a 20 foot hose to distance the flame from the gas tank. The valve at the bottom of the torch releases gas up through the pipe to a small nozzle at the head. When ignited, the flame extends approximately 6 feet long and several feet in diameter. Torches were used to repair local area damage that resulted when heated wrapped pipe sections were placed on skids to cool down, and to install heat-shrink pipe sleeves over tie-in joints.

2016.015.002.13 - Propane Pipe Sleeve Torch, 1975. Steel and brass propane torch. The cylindrical head of the torch is 5” long with a 1.5” diameter. The torch head has multiple air holes including four 3/8" diameter holes spaced equidistant around the circumference near the base. Six rows, each comprised of six 1/4 inch holes, appear down the length of the torch head and are spaced at 0.5” apart from each other around the circumference. The torch head is attached to 0.5” diameter metal tubing that is bent at a 30 degree angle a few inches below the head. After the bend, the tube extends for 10 inches where a brass valve is attached to regulate the flow of gas. A black sleeve of heat shrink plastic covers the lower 7.5" of tubing. This torch was used by Jim Thompson during the Trans-Alaska Pipeline construction project. His role was to show workers how to correctly install Raychem Corporation products and teach quality control inspectors the criteria for correct installation. He notes that when in use, the torch was connected to a propane bottle with a regulator via a 20 foot hose to distance the flame from the gas tank. The valve at the bottom of the torch releases gas up through the pipe to a small nozzle at the head. When ignited, the flame extends approximately 6 feet long and several feet in diameter. Torches were used to repair local area damage that resulted when heated wrapped pipe sections were placed on skids to cool down, and to install heat-shrink pipe sleeves over tie-in joints.

Propane Pipe Sleeve Torch, 1975. Steel and brass propane torch. The cylindrical head of the torch is 5” long with a 1.5” diameter. The torch head has multiple air holes including four 3/8" diameter holes spaced equidistant around the circumference near the base. Six rows, each comprised of six 1/4 inch holes, appear down the length of the torch head and are spaced at 0.5” apart from each other around the circumference. The torch head is attached to 0.5” diameter metal tubing that is bent at a 30 degree angle a few inches below the head. After the bend, the tube extends for 10 inches where a brass valve is attached to regulate the flow of gas. A black sleeve of heat shrink plastic covers the l

Image of 2016.015.002.12 - Cam-Hi Safety Cap, 1973. Hard hat issued to Jim Thompson while working on the Trans-Alaska Pipeline project for the Raychem Corporation in 1975.  The hard hat has a blue molded plastic outer shell with a visor that is 2.25" wide. The sides and back of the brim are upturned approximately 0.5" for catching water and taper as the sides meet the visor in front. A small tab with a hole is molded on the right and left side of the shell for attaching strings to secure the hard hat in place on one's head. A rectangular 1.25" x 4" sticker with "Raychem" in black font on a gray background is adhered on the right and left side of the shell. The left side also has an oval sticker with red and black text on a clear background that reads, "Raychem  /  PIPE PROTECTION  /  DIVISION." "Raychem" is printed in red and "Pipe Projection Division" is printed in black.  On the front of the shell, "Jim" and "Thompson" are printed in black on two clear rectangular adhesive labels. An embossed vinyl adhesive label with "THOMPSON" in white font on a black background is adhered on the back center of the shell under a red and green sticker that reads, "RAYCHEM  /  SAFETY IS NO ACCIDENT  /  MINE SPLICE KITS AND CABLE REPAIR SLEEVES." The hat has an adjustable four point suspension made with plastic, cloth, and leather. The suspension protects the head so it is not in direct contact with the plastic shell. Leather is sewn over the front half of the headband, and the band has pinlock adjustment at the back. A brown cord can be tightened or loosened to adjust the tension of the suspension crown straps. A teletemp temperature sensing label is adhered on the interior of the shell on the left side, and a white sticker with specification information is adhered on the interior at the back. "Cam-Hi Safety Cap  /  CH-69-C  /  MADE IN U.S.A." is molded into the underside of the visor above a manufacturing date code of 1973 with unknown day and month markings.

This hard hat was used by Jim Thompson during his work on the Trans-Alaska Pipeline construction project in 1975. Thompson notes that the project was defined as "hard hat" meaning one was worn at all times on the construction site. Hard hat color was used to define different types of workers, and the blue was unique to Raychem.  Temperature sensing labels, such as the one on the interior of the hat, were used by quality control engineers like Thompson for quick and dirty readings while testing pipe temperatures. After his time working on the Trans-Alaska Pipeline, Thompson used this hat again for other Raychem projects. The rectangular Raychem stickers were original to the hat when issued, but others were later additions such as the Raychem Pipe Protection sticker that was added after the division was formed in 1977.

2016.015.002.12 - Cam-Hi Safety Cap, 1973. Hard hat issued to Jim Thompson while working on the Trans-Alaska Pipeline project for the Raychem Corporation in 1975. The hard hat has a blue molded plastic outer shell with a visor that is 2.25" wide. The sides and back of the brim are upturned approximately 0.5" for catching water and taper as the sides meet the visor in front. A small tab with a hole is molded on the right and left side of the shell for attaching strings to secure the hard hat in place on one's head. A rectangular 1.25" x 4" sticker with "Raychem" in black font on a gray background is adhered on the right and left side of the shell. The left side also has an oval sticker with red and black text on a clear background that reads, "Raychem / PIPE PROTECTION / DIVISION." "Raychem" is printed in red and "Pipe Projection Division" is printed in black. On the front of the shell, "Jim" and "Thompson" are printed in black on two clear rectangular adhesive labels. An embossed vinyl adhesive label with "THOMPSON" in white font on a black background is adhered on the back center of the shell under a red and green sticker that reads, "RAYCHEM / SAFETY IS NO ACCIDENT / MINE SPLICE KITS AND CABLE REPAIR SLEEVES." The hat has an adjustable four point suspension made with plastic, cloth, and leather. The suspension protects the head so it is not in direct contact with the plastic shell. Leather is sewn over the front half of the headband, and the band has pinlock adjustment at the back. A brown cord can be tightened or loosened to adjust the tension of the suspension crown straps. A teletemp temperature sensing label is adhered on the interior of the shell on the left side, and a white sticker with specification information is adhered on the interior at the back. "Cam-Hi Safety Cap / CH-69-C / MADE IN U.S.A." is molded into the underside of the visor above a manufacturing date code of 1973 with unknown day and month markings. This hard hat was used by Jim Thompson during his work on the Trans-Alaska Pipeline construction project in 1975. Thompson notes that the project was defined as "hard hat" meaning one was worn at all times on the construction site. Hard hat color was used to define different types of workers, and the blue was unique to Raychem. Temperature sensing labels, such as the one on the interior of the hat, were used by quality control engineers like Thompson for quick and dirty readings while testing pipe temperatures. After his time working on the Trans-Alaska Pipeline, Thompson used this hat again for other Raychem projects. The rectangular Raychem stickers were original to the hat when issued, but others were later additions such as the Raychem Pipe Protection sticker that was added after the division was formed in 1977.

Cam-Hi Safety Cap, 1973. Hard hat issued to Jim Thompson while working on the Trans-Alaska Pipeline project for the Raychem Corporation in 1975. The hard hat has a blue molded plastic outer shell with a visor that is 2.25" wide. The sides and back of the brim are upturned approximately 0.5" for catching water and taper as the sides meet the visor in front. A small tab with a hole is molded on the right and left side of the shell for attaching strings to secure the hard hat in place on one's head. A rectangular 1.25" x 4" sticker with "Raychem" in black font on a gray background is adhered on the right and left side of the shell. The left side also has an oval sticker with red and black text

2016.015.002.10 - Alyeska Arctic Wear Parka, c. 1972-1975. Down parka designed and produced by the Woolrich Company for the Trans-Alaska Pipeline construction project. The outer shell is constructed with dark green heat and flame resistant nomex aramid fiber. The hood is trimmed with tawny coyote fur, and two cotton cords can be pulled to cinch the hood into a tunnel shape for protection against wind. The front of the parka has four flap patch pockets. Each pocket is secured with a single round green button. The lower pockets are 10.75” x 9” and the upper pockets are slightly smaller at 7.75” x 6.25”. The proper left top pocket also has a vertical button hole visible underneath the flap. A placket with five buttons covers a two way zipper closure. The top zipper slider has a brown leather pull attached. Olive green ribbed cuffs are sewn inside the sleeves and a rectangular brown leather patch is sewn on each elbow. Inside the parka, blue nylon lining is quilted over down insulation. A white and black rectangular label is sewn into the lining on the area of the upper back. A woven black border surrounds woven black text that reads, "ALYESKA / ARCTIC WEAR." Two small tags are sewn underneath this label. A size tag is attached at bottom center marked "L", and a tag sewn in a loop at the top right corner reads, "OUTER-SHELL-NOMEX ARAMID FIBER / LINING-100% Nylon / INSULATION-Down." There are two 8” x 6.5” interior pockets near the waistline with elastic at the top opening. A white rectangular plasticized label used for writing someone's name into the coat is sewn on the proper left interior pocket. A cotton cord is sewn into the coat to cinch the waist, and a strap with two metal rings is sewn onto the back of the parka to secure the hood down. This coat was issued to Jim Thompson after he completed safety training for the Trans-Alaska Pipeline construction project in 1975. He notes that the jacket was one piece of a set of issued clothing, including a secondary jacket worn inside the parka, insulated nomex pants with suspenders, boots with two sets of ½ inch felt liners, and wool socks. These clothes protected workers on the construction site from extreme cold temperatures, moisture, wind, and particularly for this pipeline project, fire.

Alyeska Arctic Wear Parka, c. 1972-1975. Down parka designed and produced by the Woolrich Company for the Trans-Alaska Pipeline construction project. The outer shell is constructed with dark green heat and flame resistant nomex aramid fiber. The hood is trimmed with tawny coyote fur, and two cotton cords can be pulled to cinch the hood into a tunnel shape for protection against wind. The front of the parka has four flap patch pockets. Each pocket is secured with a single round green button. The lower pockets are 10.75” x 9” and the upper pockets are slightly smaller at 7.75” x 6.25”. The proper left top pocket also has a vertical button hole visible underneath the flap. A placket with five bu

Image of 2016.015.002.11 - Three-Fingered Gloves, c. 1972-1975. Three-fingered insulated gloves manufactured by Kebek Industries for the Trans-Alaska Pipeline construction project. Green nylon makes up the top side of the gloves with a band of black synthetic fur sewn over the area covering the back of the hand. The underside of the gloves is constructed with green nylon below the wrist and cream colored leather in the area of the palm and fingers, including the entire thumb sheath. On the inner side of the thumb sheath, a 1/8” strip of leather extends past the stitching on both gloves. The gloves are filled with synthetic batting and lined in white synthetic fabric. A 2” wide piece of red synthetic fur is sewn in the interior of the gloves just below the elasticized opening. Both gloves have a 1” x 4” white label sewn over the red faux fur for writing the glove owner's name. The right glove also has a fabric tag sewn above the plasticized label. Blue text printed on the tag reads, “Kebek  /  INDUSTRIES  /  KNOXVILLE TENN.” A black “L” is printed below.
This pair of gloves was issued to Jim Thompson after he completed safety training for the Trans-Alaska Pipeline construction project. He notes that the gloves were one piece of a set of issued clothing, including an insulated parka, a secondary jacket worn underneath the parka, insulated pants with suspenders, boots with two sets of 1/2 inch felt liners, and heavy wool socks. These clothes protected workers on the construction site from extreme cold temperatures, moisture, wind, and in particular for this project, fire.

2016.015.002.11 - Three-Fingered Gloves, c. 1972-1975. Three-fingered insulated gloves manufactured by Kebek Industries for the Trans-Alaska Pipeline construction project. Green nylon makes up the top side of the gloves with a band of black synthetic fur sewn over the area covering the back of the hand. The underside of the gloves is constructed with green nylon below the wrist and cream colored leather in the area of the palm and fingers, including the entire thumb sheath. On the inner side of the thumb sheath, a 1/8” strip of leather extends past the stitching on both gloves. The gloves are filled with synthetic batting and lined in white synthetic fabric. A 2” wide piece of red synthetic fur is sewn in the interior of the gloves just below the elasticized opening. Both gloves have a 1” x 4” white label sewn over the red faux fur for writing the glove owner's name. The right glove also has a fabric tag sewn above the plasticized label. Blue text printed on the tag reads, “Kebek / INDUSTRIES / KNOXVILLE TENN.” A black “L” is printed below. This pair of gloves was issued to Jim Thompson after he completed safety training for the Trans-Alaska Pipeline construction project. He notes that the gloves were one piece of a set of issued clothing, including an insulated parka, a secondary jacket worn underneath the parka, insulated pants with suspenders, boots with two sets of 1/2 inch felt liners, and heavy wool socks. These clothes protected workers on the construction site from extreme cold temperatures, moisture, wind, and in particular for this project, fire.

Three-Fingered Gloves, c. 1972-1975. Three-fingered insulated gloves manufactured by Kebek Industries for the Trans-Alaska Pipeline construction project. Green nylon makes up the top side of the gloves with a band of black synthetic fur sewn over the area covering the back of the hand. The underside of the gloves is constructed with green nylon below the wrist and cream colored leather in the area of the palm and fingers, including the entire thumb sheath. On the inner side of the thumb sheath, a 1/8” strip of leather extends past the stitching on both gloves. The gloves are filled with synthetic batting and lined in white synthetic fabric. A 2” wide piece of red synthetic fur is sewn in the

Image of 2016.015.002.31 - Alyeska Pipeline Orientation Certificate of Completion Badge, August 4, 1975. This is a rectangular laminated blue paper badge issued to James C. Thompson for completing orientation training for the Trans-Alaska Pipeline construction project. Bold text at top center reads, "ALYESKA PIPELINE ORIENTATION  /  CERTIFICATE OF COMPLETION."  Below, information is typewritten on lines for name, date, social security number, and certificate approval. Text reads, "Name: Thompson, J.C.  /  Date: 8/4/75  /  S. S. No. [crossed out in black ink]  /  Approved By: James Kisse[lli]ng." The back side of the badge is blank.

2016.015.002.31 - Alyeska Pipeline Orientation Certificate of Completion Badge, August 4, 1975. This is a rectangular laminated blue paper badge issued to James C. Thompson for completing orientation training for the Trans-Alaska Pipeline construction project. Bold text at top center reads, "ALYESKA PIPELINE ORIENTATION / CERTIFICATE OF COMPLETION." Below, information is typewritten on lines for name, date, social security number, and certificate approval. Text reads, "Name: Thompson, J.C. / Date: 8/4/75 / S. S. No. [crossed out in black ink] / Approved By: James Kisse[lli]ng." The back side of the badge is blank.

Alyeska Pipeline Orientation Certificate of Completion Badge, August 4, 1975. This is a rectangular laminated blue paper badge issued to James C. Thompson for completing orientation training for the Trans-Alaska Pipeline construction project. Bold text at top center reads, "ALYESKA PIPELINE ORIENTATION / CERTIFICATE OF COMPLETION." Below, information is typewritten on lines for name, date, social security number, and certificate approval. Text reads, "Name: Thompson, J.C. / Date: 8/4/75 / S. S. No. [crossed out in black ink] / Approved By: James Kisse[lli]ng." The back side of the badge is blank.

Image of 2016.015.002.32 - Alyeska Pipeline Service Company Identification Badge, 1975. This is a rectangular laminated Alyeska identification badge issued to James C. Thompson for the Trans-Alaska Pipeline construction project. A color photograph of Thompson against a green and white diagonal striped background fills the upper half of the badge. Thompson has medium length brown hair and wears a light colored collared shirt and wire rim glasses. The lower half of the badge shows printed lines with information typewritten in black ink. Text reads, "CONT - CONSULT [construction consultant]  /  J C THOMPSON  /  Med Alert NONE  /  [Social Security number crossed out in black ink]  /  James C Thompson [cursive signature in blue ink]  /  Signature  /  RAYCHEM.” A large `P' in black ink on a square of pink paper is adhered to the bottom left corner, and a sticker with “Alyeska” in black ink on a clear plastic background is adhered vertically at center left over the photograph and printed information. There is a 0.125" x 0.5" hole at top center for attaching a strap. The back of the badge has a torn adhesive label with a white background and a black and red horizontal stripe at center. Partial text is visible. From top to bottom, “A [black ink]  /  WOR[illegible, printed diagonally in red ink]  /  0 [illegible, red ink]  /  0 [illegible] 19  /  [illegible, black ink] S: OCT 3 [red ink].” Thompson notes that the text on the back of the badge was likely entrance and exit stamps from the various construction camps working on the pipeline.

2016.015.002.32 - Alyeska Pipeline Service Company Identification Badge, 1975. This is a rectangular laminated Alyeska identification badge issued to James C. Thompson for the Trans-Alaska Pipeline construction project. A color photograph of Thompson against a green and white diagonal striped background fills the upper half of the badge. Thompson has medium length brown hair and wears a light colored collared shirt and wire rim glasses. The lower half of the badge shows printed lines with information typewritten in black ink. Text reads, "CONT - CONSULT [construction consultant] / J C THOMPSON / Med Alert NONE / [Social Security number crossed out in black ink] / James C Thompson [cursive signature in blue ink] / Signature / RAYCHEM.” A large `P' in black ink on a square of pink paper is adhered to the bottom left corner, and a sticker with “Alyeska” in black ink on a clear plastic background is adhered vertically at center left over the photograph and printed information. There is a 0.125" x 0.5" hole at top center for attaching a strap. The back of the badge has a torn adhesive label with a white background and a black and red horizontal stripe at center. Partial text is visible. From top to bottom, “A [black ink] / WOR[illegible, printed diagonally in red ink] / 0 [illegible, red ink] / 0 [illegible] 19 / [illegible, black ink] S: OCT 3 [red ink].” Thompson notes that the text on the back of the badge was likely entrance and exit stamps from the various construction camps working on the pipeline.

Alyeska Pipeline Service Company Identification Badge, 1975. This is a rectangular laminated Alyeska identification badge issued to James C. Thompson for the Trans-Alaska Pipeline construction project. A color photograph of Thompson against a green and white diagonal striped background fills the upper half of the badge. Thompson has medium length brown hair and wears a light colored collared shirt and wire rim glasses. The lower half of the badge shows printed lines with information typewritten in black ink. Text reads, "CONT - CONSULT [construction consultant] / J C THOMPSON / Med Alert NONE / [Social Security number crossed out in black ink] / James C Thompson [cursive signature in

Image of 2016.015.001.111.1 - Untitled (Trans-Alaska Pipeline Construction), October 1975

2016.015.001.111.1 - Untitled (Trans-Alaska Pipeline Construction), October 1975

Untitled (Trans-Alaska Pipeline Construction), October 1975. This image shows a snowy landscape in Alaska. A dirt road is visible at left moving from the foreground to the background. An uncovered pipeline appears at mid-ground in the image and extends from a grove of brush at center right into the distance just left of center. Snow covered mountains are visible across the center of the image and the sky is filled with gray clouds. A blue vertical line appears in the image along the right margin, which is caused by crimping to the film where it is attached to the leader. The cardboard slide mount is printed with a red and yellow Kodak symbol and text on one side and frame number and date info

Image of 2016.015.001.111.2 - Untitled (Raychem Desertclad Tape Trial in Alaska), November 1975

2016.015.001.111.2 - Untitled (Raychem Desertclad Tape Trial in Alaska), November 1975

Untitled (Raychem Desertclad Tape Trial in Alaska), November 1975. This color slide shows a close up view of machinery applying white Desertclad heat shrink coating to a section of pipe. A roll of white tape appears at upper left and is rolled onto a large metal pipe at bottom center. The machinery in the image is painted yellow and the surface has multiple chips and scratches. Desertclad was a product that the Raychem Corporation was testing for use coating oil pipelines in desert conditions. This trial was performed in Alaska during the same period that Raychem was working on coating the Trans-Alaska Pipeline.

Image of 2016.015.001.111.3 - Untitled (Raychem Desertclad Tape Trial in Alaska), November 1975

2016.015.001.111.3 - Untitled (Raychem Desertclad Tape Trial in Alaska), November 1975

Untitled (Raychem Desertclad Tape Trial in Alaska), November 1975. This color slide shows workers overseeing machinery that is applying white Desertclad heat shrink coating to a section of pipe. A large pipe partially wrapped in white tape appears at center left, with a large piece of equipment rolling the tape onto the pipe at center. Three people wearing protective outerwear are visible next to the pipe and machinery at center. Two of the people face away from the camera on either side of a man seen in profile at center who has blond hair and wears an orange hat and brown jumpsuit. Two additional people are partially visible at center right. Desertclad was a product that the Raychem Corpo

Image of 2016.015.001.111.4 - Untitled (Raychem Desertclad Tape Trial in Alaska), November 1975

2016.015.001.111.4 - Untitled (Raychem Desertclad Tape Trial in Alaska), November 1975

Untitled (Raychem Desertclad Tape Trial in Alaska), November 1975. This color slide shows a trial for the application of Desertclad tape to a hot pipe in a snowy Alaska landscape. An unwrapped section of pipe is visible at center right in the foreground that extends toward the heating and wrapping operation at center. Four side boom crawler cranes appear in a row at center supporting heating units around the pipe. Three automobiles and several pieces of equipment appear at center left. Pine trees are visible in the distance at center left and just right of center. The sky is overcast with gray clouds. Desertclad was a product that the Raychem Corporation was testing for coating oil pipelines

Image of 2016.015.001.111.5 - Untitled (Raychem Desertclad Tape Trial in Alaska), November 1975

2016.015.001.111.5 - Untitled (Raychem Desertclad Tape Trial in Alaska), November 1975

Untitled (Raychem Desertclad Tape Trial in Alaska), November 1975. This color slide shows a Caterpillar side boom crawler crane in a snowy landscape that is supporting a section of pipe with a rolling sling during a product trial of Raychem Desertclad heat shrink coating. The yellow painted crane appears at left with a section of unwrapped pipe visible at right. A blue piece of material is covering the front of the crane, and part of the machine is painted with black stripes. A cylindrical heater is partially visible around the pipe just behind the rolling sling. The sky is overcast with gray clouds. Desertclad was a product that the Raychem Corporation was testing for coating oil pipelines

Image of 2016.015.001.111.6 - Untitled (Raychem Desertclad Tape Trial in Alaska), November 1975

2016.015.001.111.6 - Untitled (Raychem Desertclad Tape Trial in Alaska), November 1975

Untitled (Raychem Desertclad Tape Trial in Alaska), November 1975. This color slide shows two heaters around a section of unwrapped pipe in a snowy landscape. The heaters are cylindrical and wrap around the exterior of the pipe. The heaters both have black tubing connecting to their sides and a set of metal runners on the underside. Metal loops at top provide a place to attach the units to an overhead metal structure. Desertclad was a product that the Raychem Corporation was testing for coating oil pipelines in desert conditions. The trial was performed in Alaska during the time that Raychem was also working on coating the Trans-Alaska Pipeline.

Image of 2016.015.001.111.7 - Untitled (Raychem Desertclad Tape Trial in Alaska), November 1975

2016.015.001.111.7 - Untitled (Raychem Desertclad Tape Trial in Alaska), November 1975

Untitled (Raychem Desertclad Tape Trial in Alaska), November 1975. This color slide shows a row of heaters around a section of unwrapped pipe in an outdoor setting. The heaters are cylindrical and wrap around the exterior of the pipe with an overhead metal structure to support and move the units along the pipe by crane. A flame from one of the heaters is visible at center. The heaters were fueled by propane and would raise the pipe temperature to about 200 degrees Fahrenheit. A person in silhouette stands next to one of the heaters at lower right in the image. Desertclad was a product that the Raychem Corporation was testing for coating oil pipelines in desert conditions. The trial was perfo

Image of 2016.015.001.111.8 - Untitled (Raychem Desertclad Tape Trial in Alaska), November 1975

2016.015.001.111.8 - Untitled (Raychem Desertclad Tape Trial in Alaska), November 1975

Untitled (Raychem Desertclad Tape Trial in Alaska), November 1975. This color slide shows white Desertclad tape coating a section of pipeline in a snowy landscape. The pipe extends from the foreground at lower right into the distance at upper left. A propane tank rests on the ground at bottom center. A crane, several people, and an automobile are visible at upper left. Desertclad was a product that the Raychem Corporation was testing for coating oil pipelines in desert conditions. The trial was performed in Alaska during the time that Raychem was also working on coating the Trans-Alaska Pipeline.

Image of 2016.015.001.111.9 - Untitled (Fred Smith at Raychem Desertclad Tape Trial in Alaska), November 1975

2016.015.001.111.9 - Untitled (Fred Smith at Raychem Desertclad Tape Trial in Alaska), November 1975

Untitled (Fred Smith at Raychem Desertclad Tape Trial in Alaska), November 1975. This color slide shows Raychem employee Fred Smith standing in front of a section of pipeline that is wrapped in white Desertclad tape with snowcapped mountains in the background. Smith wears an Alyeska Arctic Wear Parka that was issued to workers on the Trans-Alaska pipeline construction project along with a blue Raychem hardhat and an orange knit face mask. Desertclad was a product that the Raychem Corporation was testing for coating oil pipelines in desert conditions. The trial was performed in Alaska during the time that Raychem was also working on coating the Trans-Alaska Pipeline.

Image of 2017.006.003 - Untitled (Raychem Alyeska Pipeline Construction), 1975

2017.006.003 - Untitled (Raychem Alyeska Pipeline Construction), 1975

Untitled (Raychem Alyeska Pipeline Construction), 1975. This is a 5" x 5" color photograph that shows construction of the Trans-Alaska Pipeline. The construction work appears within a landscape with plains partially covered by snow that lead to a mountain range in the distance. A long length of pipe is positioned slightly above a dirt road across the lower portion of the image. On the right side of the pipe, a yellow side boom crawler crane pulls four silver heater units that encircle the pipe. A second yellow crane pulls equipment that wraps the pipe in black heat shrink plastic coating made by the Raychem Corporation. A truck follows behind the pipe wrapping machinery at left. About half a