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The mission of the San Mateo County Historical Association is to inspire wonder and discovery
of the cultural and natural history of San Mateo County.

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Name Menlo Park
Number of Archive records 41
Number of Object records 63
Number of Photo records 132

Associated Records

Image of 2015.029.001 - Raychem Corporation Office Procedures Manual, 1987-1988.  One 3-inch binder that documents Raychem corporate information and office procedures. The manual provides profiles for the corporate officers and the board of directors, the corporate structure and responsibilities, Who Works With Whom directory listings, organizational charts, procedures for using corporate services, forms and an index. The manual also includes a short history of Raychem, company and employee information as well as maps and meeting and travel guidelines.

2015.029.001 - Raychem Corporation Office Procedures Manual, 1987-1988. One 3-inch binder that documents Raychem corporate information and office procedures. The manual provides profiles for the corporate officers and the board of directors, the corporate structure and responsibilities, Who Works With Whom directory listings, organizational charts, procedures for using corporate services, forms and an index. The manual also includes a short history of Raychem, company and employee information as well as maps and meeting and travel guidelines.

Raychem Corporation Office Procedures Manual, 1987-1988. One 3-inch binder that documents Raychem corporate information and office procedures. The manual provides profiles for the corporate officers and the board of directors, the corporate structure and responsibilities, Who Works With Whom directory listings, organizational charts, procedures for using corporate services, forms and an index. The manual also includes a short history of Raychem, company and employee information as well as maps and meeting and travel guidelines.

Image of 2015.029.007 - Raychem 1957 to Tyco Electronics 2007 50th Anniversary DVD, 2007.  The DVD is in a yellow jewel case.  The DVD is white with a red arrow point upwards in the center.  The bottom of the arrow reads "1957" and the top reads "2007".  Below the arrow the words "Raychem Accountability Teamwork Integrity Innovation" appears.  Above the arrow the DVD reads, "50" and "Tyco Electronics".  The DVD has a run time of 97 minutes and 40 seconds (1:37:40).  The contents of the DVD are a year by year history of Raychem from 1957 to 2007.  Each year has a quick written description of the highlights of that year - products, companies acquired, earnings, corporate officers, corporate organization and size of workforce for example.  After the written descriptions for the year there is an image slideshow accompanied by a hit song from that year.  The images includes products, product sketches, annual reports, list of corporate officers and directors, earning reports, company cartoons, employees, manufacturing, facilities, campuses, logos, and research and development.

2015.029.007 - Raychem 1957 to Tyco Electronics 2007 50th Anniversary DVD, 2007. The DVD is in a yellow jewel case. The DVD is white with a red arrow point upwards in the center. The bottom of the arrow reads "1957" and the top reads "2007". Below the arrow the words "Raychem Accountability Teamwork Integrity Innovation" appears. Above the arrow the DVD reads, "50" and "Tyco Electronics". The DVD has a run time of 97 minutes and 40 seconds (1:37:40). The contents of the DVD are a year by year history of Raychem from 1957 to 2007. Each year has a quick written description of the highlights of that year - products, companies acquired, earnings, corporate officers, corporate organization and size of workforce for example. After the written descriptions for the year there is an image slideshow accompanied by a hit song from that year. The images includes products, product sketches, annual reports, list of corporate officers and directors, earning reports, company cartoons, employees, manufacturing, facilities, campuses, logos, and research and development.

Raychem 1957 to Tyco Electronics 2007 50th Anniversary DVD, 2007. The DVD is in a yellow jewel case. The DVD is white with a red arrow point upwards in the center. The bottom of the arrow reads "1957" and the top reads "2007". Below the arrow the words "Raychem Accountability Teamwork Integrity Innovation" appears. Above the arrow the DVD reads, "50" and "Tyco Electronics". The DVD has a run time of 97 minutes and 40 seconds (1:37:40). The contents of the DVD are a year by year history of Raychem from 1957 to 2007. Each year has a quick written description of the highlights of that year - products, companies acquired, earnings, corporate officers, corporate organization and size of wo

Image of 2016.001.050 - Raychem Auto-Trace Self-limiting Heaters Overhead Transparency, n.d. Mylar transparency with black and red ink. The transparency is titled: "Auto-Trace Self-limiting Heaters  /  Respond to Temperature" printed in black at the top. Below the title is a line graph with y-axis at resistance and x-axis as temperature. There is a second graph printed below with y-axis as wattage and x-axis as temperature. 

Inscription: 
"Auto-Trace Self-limiting Heaters  /  Respond to Temperature  /  ...  /  "Resistance of Auto-Trace increases dramatically...  /  Wattache ourput of Auto-Trace decreases dramatically..." (printed in black ink). 

Dimensions:
11 x 8.5

2016.001.050 - Raychem Auto-Trace Self-limiting Heaters Overhead Transparency, n.d. Mylar transparency with black and red ink. The transparency is titled: "Auto-Trace Self-limiting Heaters / Respond to Temperature" printed in black at the top. Below the title is a line graph with y-axis at resistance and x-axis as temperature. There is a second graph printed below with y-axis as wattage and x-axis as temperature. Inscription: "Auto-Trace Self-limiting Heaters / Respond to Temperature / ... / "Resistance of Auto-Trace increases dramatically... / Wattache ourput of Auto-Trace decreases dramatically..." (printed in black ink). Dimensions: 11 x 8.5

Raychem Auto-Trace Self-limiting Heaters Overhead Transparency, n.d. Mylar transparency with black and red ink. The transparency is titled: "Auto-Trace Self-limiting Heaters / Respond to Temperature" printed in black at the top. Below the title is a line graph with y-axis at resistance and x-axis as temperature. There is a second graph printed below with y-axis as wattage and x-axis as temperature. Inscription: "Auto-Trace Self-limiting Heaters / Respond to Temperature / ... / "Resistance of Auto-Trace increases dramatically... / Wattache ourput of Auto-Trace decreases dramatically..." (printed in black ink). Dimensions: 11 x 8.5

Image of 2016.001.046 - Raychem 1957 to Tyco Electronics 2007 50th Anniversary DVD, 2007.  The DVD is in a yellow jewel case.  The DVD is white with a red arrow point upwards in the center.  The bottom of the arrow reads "1957" and the top reads "2007".  Below the arrow the words "Raychem Accountability Teamwork Integrity Innovation" appears.  Above the arrow the DVD reads, "50" and "Tyco Electronics".  The DVD has a run time of 97 minutes and 40 seconds (1:37:40).  The contents of the DVD are a year by year history of Raychem from 1957 to 2007.  Each year has a quick written description of the highlights of that year - products, companies acquired, earnings, corporate officers, corporate organization and size of workforce for example.  After the written descriptions for the year there is an image slideshow accompanied by a hit song from that year.  The images includes products, product sketches, annual reports, list of corporate officers and directors, earning reports, company cartoons, employees, manufacturing, facilities, campuses, logos, and research and development.

2016.001.046 - Raychem 1957 to Tyco Electronics 2007 50th Anniversary DVD, 2007. The DVD is in a yellow jewel case. The DVD is white with a red arrow point upwards in the center. The bottom of the arrow reads "1957" and the top reads "2007". Below the arrow the words "Raychem Accountability Teamwork Integrity Innovation" appears. Above the arrow the DVD reads, "50" and "Tyco Electronics". The DVD has a run time of 97 minutes and 40 seconds (1:37:40). The contents of the DVD are a year by year history of Raychem from 1957 to 2007. Each year has a quick written description of the highlights of that year - products, companies acquired, earnings, corporate officers, corporate organization and size of workforce for example. After the written descriptions for the year there is an image slideshow accompanied by a hit song from that year. The images includes products, product sketches, annual reports, list of corporate officers and directors, earning reports, company cartoons, employees, manufacturing, facilities, campuses, logos, and research and development.

Raychem 1957 to Tyco Electronics 2007 50th Anniversary DVD, 2007. The DVD is in a yellow jewel case. The DVD is white with a red arrow point upwards in the center. The bottom of the arrow reads "1957" and the top reads "2007". Below the arrow the words "Raychem Accountability Teamwork Integrity Innovation" appears. Above the arrow the DVD reads, "50" and "Tyco Electronics". The DVD has a run time of 97 minutes and 40 seconds (1:37:40). The contents of the DVD are a year by year history of Raychem from 1957 to 2007. Each year has a quick written description of the highlights of that year - products, companies acquired, earnings, corporate officers, corporate organization and size of wo

Image of 2016.001.018A-J - Chet Sandberg Raychem Corporation Chemelex Business Cards, c. 1971-1980s. Ten business cards for Chet Sandberg. The first five cards are for Chemelex, which are white cards with blue and black ink. Two cards from 1971 list Sandberg's position as "APPLICATION ENGINEER" and "OEM MARKETING MANAGER". Two cards from 1975 list Sandberg's position as "OEM Marketing Manager" and "Manager, Consumer Products". The last Chemelex card, from 1977, also shows him as a "Manager  /  Consumer Products". The next five cards are for Raychem printed on white paper with black and red ink. The first card is from 1978 and Sandberg was a "Marketing Technical  /  Support Manager". The last three cards list 1980. He held the positions of "Manager  /  Consumer Products", "Chief Engineer", "Electrical Engineering  /  Manager" and "Chief Mad Scientist". Business cards are mounted with scotch tape on three panels of foam core. The sections are taped together with scotch tape and scotch tape lines the edges. Eight red sticker dots surround the last Raychem business card.

2016.001.018A-J - Chet Sandberg Raychem Corporation Chemelex Business Cards, c. 1971-1980s. Ten business cards for Chet Sandberg. The first five cards are for Chemelex, which are white cards with blue and black ink. Two cards from 1971 list Sandberg's position as "APPLICATION ENGINEER" and "OEM MARKETING MANAGER". Two cards from 1975 list Sandberg's position as "OEM Marketing Manager" and "Manager, Consumer Products". The last Chemelex card, from 1977, also shows him as a "Manager / Consumer Products". The next five cards are for Raychem printed on white paper with black and red ink. The first card is from 1978 and Sandberg was a "Marketing Technical / Support Manager". The last three cards list 1980. He held the positions of "Manager / Consumer Products", "Chief Engineer", "Electrical Engineering / Manager" and "Chief Mad Scientist". Business cards are mounted with scotch tape on three panels of foam core. The sections are taped together with scotch tape and scotch tape lines the edges. Eight red sticker dots surround the last Raychem business card.

Chet Sandberg Raychem Corporation Chemelex Business Cards, c. 1971-1980s. Ten business cards for Chet Sandberg. The first five cards are for Chemelex, which are white cards with blue and black ink. Two cards from 1971 list Sandberg's position as "APPLICATION ENGINEER" and "OEM MARKETING MANAGER". Two cards from 1975 list Sandberg's position as "OEM Marketing Manager" and "Manager, Consumer Products". The last Chemelex card, from 1977, also shows him as a "Manager / Consumer Products". The next five cards are for Raychem printed on white paper with black and red ink. The first card is from 1978 and Sandberg was a "Marketing Technical / Support Manager". The last three cards list 1980. He h

Image of 2009.030.101 - Plaque commemorating Trish King of Menlo-Atherton High School being inducted into the San Mateo County Sports Hall of Fame on May 18, 1993.  Plaque includes image of King and a brief biography:  "Menlo-Atherton High alumna Trish King was a Cinderella story for the 1988 United States Olympic track and field team.  /  As a high scool and college athlete at the Univeristy of Oregon, she had never high-jumped beyond 5 feet, 11 inches.  But, during the 1988 Olympic trials, she soared a full six inches beyond that height and easily mad the United States track and field team.  /  However, at the Seoul Olympics, she high-jumped 6 feet, 3 1/4 inches and wound up out of medal contention.  /  At Menlo-Atherton, she was a multi-sport athlete, participating in soccer, swimming and track and field.  Her best prep high jump was 5 feet, 9 1/4 inches."

2009.030.101 - Plaque commemorating Trish King of Menlo-Atherton High School being inducted into the San Mateo County Sports Hall of Fame on May 18, 1993. Plaque includes image of King and a brief biography: "Menlo-Atherton High alumna Trish King was a Cinderella story for the 1988 United States Olympic track and field team. / As a high scool and college athlete at the Univeristy of Oregon, she had never high-jumped beyond 5 feet, 11 inches. But, during the 1988 Olympic trials, she soared a full six inches beyond that height and easily mad the United States track and field team. / However, at the Seoul Olympics, she high-jumped 6 feet, 3 1/4 inches and wound up out of medal contention. / At Menlo-Atherton, she was a multi-sport athlete, participating in soccer, swimming and track and field. Her best prep high jump was 5 feet, 9 1/4 inches."

Plaque commemorating Trish King of Menlo-Atherton High School being inducted into the San Mateo County Sports Hall of Fame on May 18, 1993. Plaque includes image of King and a brief biography: "Menlo-Atherton High alumna Trish King was a Cinderella story for the 1988 United States Olympic track and field team. / As a high scool and college athlete at the Univeristy of Oregon, she had never high-jumped beyond 5 feet, 11 inches. But, during the 1988 Olympic trials, she soared a full six inches beyond that height and easily mad the United States track and field team. / However, at the Seoul Olympics, she high-jumped 6 feet, 3 1/4 inches and wound up out of medal contention. / At Menlo-A

Image of 2009.030.167 - Wood and acrylic plaque commemorating Vern Sterling of Sequoia High School who was inducted into the San Mateo County Sports Hall of Fame on May 22, 1997.  Plaque includes image of Sterling and a brief biography"Vern Sterling was one of the finest all-around football players ever produced in San Mateo County. As a prep at Sequoia High in Redwood City, he was a two-way lineman who could dominate a game all by himself. After serving in the U.S. Marine Corps in the Pacific during World War II, he returned to the Peninsula and attended Menlo College. He transferred to nearby Santa Clara University where he captained a Bronco outfit that upset Bear Bryant's Kentucky team in the 1949 Orange Bowl."

2009.030.167 - Wood and acrylic plaque commemorating Vern Sterling of Sequoia High School who was inducted into the San Mateo County Sports Hall of Fame on May 22, 1997. Plaque includes image of Sterling and a brief biography"Vern Sterling was one of the finest all-around football players ever produced in San Mateo County. As a prep at Sequoia High in Redwood City, he was a two-way lineman who could dominate a game all by himself. After serving in the U.S. Marine Corps in the Pacific during World War II, he returned to the Peninsula and attended Menlo College. He transferred to nearby Santa Clara University where he captained a Bronco outfit that upset Bear Bryant's Kentucky team in the 1949 Orange Bowl."

Wood and acrylic plaque commemorating Vern Sterling of Sequoia High School who was inducted into the San Mateo County Sports Hall of Fame on May 22, 1997. Plaque includes image of Sterling and a brief biography"Vern Sterling was one of the finest all-around football players ever produced in San Mateo County. As a prep at Sequoia High in Redwood City, he was a two-way lineman who could dominate a game all by himself. After serving in the U.S. Marine Corps in the Pacific during World War II, he returned to the Peninsula and attended Menlo College. He transferred to nearby Santa Clara University where he captained a Bronco outfit that upset Bear Bryant's Kentucky team in the 1949 Orange Bowl."

Image of 2009.030.193 - Plaque commemorating Pam Wimberly of Menlo-Atherton High School being inducted into the San Mateo County Sports Hall of Fame on May 18, 1993.  Plaque includes image of Wimberly and a brief biography:  "For Pam Wimberly, winning has never been the only thing that matters when it comes to high school athletics.  The longtime girls' basketball coach at Menlo-Atherton High, she has won more games - 568 - than any female mentor in California.  /  At the South County school, her teams have captured 14 league varsity championships and four Central Coast Section titles.  /  But it is her off-the-court work that sets Wimberly apart.  She has been a stickler for decorum and sportsmanship, and she has imparted those often-forgotten qualities to her student athletes through the years.  /  In 1992-93, she was named the Cental Coast Section girls' basketball honor coach of the year."

2009.030.193 - Plaque commemorating Pam Wimberly of Menlo-Atherton High School being inducted into the San Mateo County Sports Hall of Fame on May 18, 1993. Plaque includes image of Wimberly and a brief biography: "For Pam Wimberly, winning has never been the only thing that matters when it comes to high school athletics. The longtime girls' basketball coach at Menlo-Atherton High, she has won more games - 568 - than any female mentor in California. / At the South County school, her teams have captured 14 league varsity championships and four Central Coast Section titles. / But it is her off-the-court work that sets Wimberly apart. She has been a stickler for decorum and sportsmanship, and she has imparted those often-forgotten qualities to her student athletes through the years. / In 1992-93, she was named the Cental Coast Section girls' basketball honor coach of the year."

Plaque commemorating Pam Wimberly of Menlo-Atherton High School being inducted into the San Mateo County Sports Hall of Fame on May 18, 1993. Plaque includes image of Wimberly and a brief biography: "For Pam Wimberly, winning has never been the only thing that matters when it comes to high school athletics. The longtime girls' basketball coach at Menlo-Atherton High, she has won more games - 568 - than any female mentor in California. / At the South County school, her teams have captured 14 league varsity championships and four Central Coast Section titles. / But it is her off-the-court work that sets Wimberly apart. She has been a stickler for decorum and sportsmanship, and she has i

Image of 2016.001.005A-B - Spider "A Strange Change Toy" Capsules, late 1960s to 1970s. Sixteen pink "time capsule" pieces made of irradiated plastic produced by the Raychem Corporation as part of "A Strange Change Toy Featuring the Lost World." The toy set was sold by Mattel, Inc., and also included a machine with a heated dome and a compressor device, tweezers, instructions, a 3-D molded plastic "Lost World Landscape," and an illustrated map. The square capsules expand into toy figures when heated. They can also be re-compressed back into squares and expanded again. Two spider figures (a-b) have eight legs, a head, torso, and an abdomen. The head has two mandibles and a protrusion coming from the mouth. The bottom of the head is embossed with two circles. Ten dots in two rows are embossed along back of the torso. The abdomen has a tear-shaped indentation and two oblong indentations to the right and left of the tear shape; the bottom has a pattern of horizontal and vertical lines. Each leg has four molded joints, and the spider's front right leg is bent underneath the body. Fourteen compressed square capsules (c-o) are embossed with Mattel's logo. The other side also has a Mattel logo and a pressed circle to the bottom left of the logo with a number embossed in the center.  The numbers range in the 50s and 60s.

2016.001.005A-B - Spider "A Strange Change Toy" Capsules, late 1960s to 1970s. Sixteen pink "time capsule" pieces made of irradiated plastic produced by the Raychem Corporation as part of "A Strange Change Toy Featuring the Lost World." The toy set was sold by Mattel, Inc., and also included a machine with a heated dome and a compressor device, tweezers, instructions, a 3-D molded plastic "Lost World Landscape," and an illustrated map. The square capsules expand into toy figures when heated. They can also be re-compressed back into squares and expanded again. Two spider figures (a-b) have eight legs, a head, torso, and an abdomen. The head has two mandibles and a protrusion coming from the mouth. The bottom of the head is embossed with two circles. Ten dots in two rows are embossed along back of the torso. The abdomen has a tear-shaped indentation and two oblong indentations to the right and left of the tear shape; the bottom has a pattern of horizontal and vertical lines. Each leg has four molded joints, and the spider's front right leg is bent underneath the body. Fourteen compressed square capsules (c-o) are embossed with Mattel's logo. The other side also has a Mattel logo and a pressed circle to the bottom left of the logo with a number embossed in the center. The numbers range in the 50s and 60s.

Spider "A Strange Change Toy" Capsules, late 1960s to 1970s. Sixteen pink "time capsule" pieces made of irradiated plastic produced by the Raychem Corporation as part of "A Strange Change Toy Featuring the Lost World." The toy set was sold by Mattel, Inc., and also included a machine with a heated dome and a compressor device, tweezers, instructions, a 3-D molded plastic "Lost World Landscape," and an illustrated map. The square capsules expand into toy figures when heated. They can also be re-compressed back into squares and expanded again. Two spider figures (a-b) have eight legs, a head, torso, and an abdomen. The head has two mandibles and a protrusion coming from the mouth. The bottom of

Image of 2014.019.010 - Terry Stogner Peninsula Sports Hall of Fame Plaque, 2014. Plaque includes image of Terry Stogner and a brief biography: "Over a professional career in high school athletics which has spanned nearly 50 years, Terry Stogner has become inextricably linked with the Peninsula Athletic League, a collection of 17 public high schools stretching from Daly City in the north to Menlo Park and Woodside in the south and to Half Moon Bay and Pacifica on the coast. As commissioner of the sprawling league, he has upgraded schedules, monitored new playoff arrangements and stimulated fresh interest in a wide range of boy's and girls' sport. Prior to his appointment as the PAL's executive director, he spent 38 years at Carlmont, 36 of them as head varsity basketball coach, with more than 300 wins. The Carlmont gymnasium was named for him in 2003."

2014.019.010 - Terry Stogner Peninsula Sports Hall of Fame Plaque, 2014. Plaque includes image of Terry Stogner and a brief biography: "Over a professional career in high school athletics which has spanned nearly 50 years, Terry Stogner has become inextricably linked with the Peninsula Athletic League, a collection of 17 public high schools stretching from Daly City in the north to Menlo Park and Woodside in the south and to Half Moon Bay and Pacifica on the coast. As commissioner of the sprawling league, he has upgraded schedules, monitored new playoff arrangements and stimulated fresh interest in a wide range of boy's and girls' sport. Prior to his appointment as the PAL's executive director, he spent 38 years at Carlmont, 36 of them as head varsity basketball coach, with more than 300 wins. The Carlmont gymnasium was named for him in 2003."

Terry Stogner Peninsula Sports Hall of Fame Plaque, 2014. Plaque includes image of Terry Stogner and a brief biography: "Over a professional career in high school athletics which has spanned nearly 50 years, Terry Stogner has become inextricably linked with the Peninsula Athletic League, a collection of 17 public high schools stretching from Daly City in the north to Menlo Park and Woodside in the south and to Half Moon Bay and Pacifica on the coast. As commissioner of the sprawling league, he has upgraded schedules, monitored new playoff arrangements and stimulated fresh interest in a wide range of boy's and girls' sport. Prior to his appointment as the PAL's executive director, he spent 38

Image of 2015.012.001 - General Electric Electron Beam Generator Electron Tube, 1957. This electron accelerator beam tube was stored for use as spare parts for "Beam 1", the first electron beam generator produced by General Electric for the Raychem Corporation. "Beam 1" was used by the Raychem Corporation in Menlo Park, California, and later by Tyco Electronics when it bought Raychem in 1999. It was the first electron beam accelerator ever put into commercial use. "Beam 1" was still in operation until 2016.

The appearance of the electron tube is that of a long metal cylander that extends into a ridged triangular cone. The cone connects to a titanium rectangular window at the base. Approximately 40" of the top of the tube is constructed with a cylindrical piece of translucent material with 11 equally spaced black enamel metal rings. The ridged triangular section near the base is 35" long and 19" wide and is painted yellow around the top. Additional hardware is attached near the middle of the tube and to the side of the triangular section. Two metal strips are attached at each end to the side of the triangular piece with four nuts and bolts.

An excerpt from General Electric Product Data Sheet A4610, August 1959 describes the Electron Tube. This datasheet is for a slightly later model that is of similar design to this artifact:
"ELECTRON TUBE - Permanently evacuated; multi-section construction. Electron beam emitted by hot tungsten filament; biased grid allows tube to conduct only during high-energy portion of input cycle. Electrons accelerated by voltage applied to intermediate electrodes…emerge through permanent window to treatment area.  /  Tube Window - 3 x 15". Made of titanium, 0.0075" thick. Cooled by forced air. Air-cooling nozzle included. (Compressor must be purchased seperately...must meet specifications appearing under AIR REQUIREMENTS-TUBE WINDOW  COOLING.)  /  Electrically controlled, air-operated, water-cooled shutter - for absorbing beam when bombardment of material in beam area is not desired, or for timed exposures."

2015.012.001 - General Electric Electron Beam Generator Electron Tube, 1957. This electron accelerator beam tube was stored for use as spare parts for "Beam 1", the first electron beam generator produced by General Electric for the Raychem Corporation. "Beam 1" was used by the Raychem Corporation in Menlo Park, California, and later by Tyco Electronics when it bought Raychem in 1999. It was the first electron beam accelerator ever put into commercial use. "Beam 1" was still in operation until 2016. The appearance of the electron tube is that of a long metal cylander that extends into a ridged triangular cone. The cone connects to a titanium rectangular window at the base. Approximately 40" of the top of the tube is constructed with a cylindrical piece of translucent material with 11 equally spaced black enamel metal rings. The ridged triangular section near the base is 35" long and 19" wide and is painted yellow around the top. Additional hardware is attached near the middle of the tube and to the side of the triangular section. Two metal strips are attached at each end to the side of the triangular piece with four nuts and bolts. An excerpt from General Electric Product Data Sheet A4610, August 1959 describes the Electron Tube. This datasheet is for a slightly later model that is of similar design to this artifact: "ELECTRON TUBE - Permanently evacuated; multi-section construction. Electron beam emitted by hot tungsten filament; biased grid allows tube to conduct only during high-energy portion of input cycle. Electrons accelerated by voltage applied to intermediate electrodes…emerge through permanent window to treatment area. / Tube Window - 3 x 15". Made of titanium, 0.0075" thick. Cooled by forced air. Air-cooling nozzle included. (Compressor must be purchased seperately...must meet specifications appearing under AIR REQUIREMENTS-TUBE WINDOW COOLING.) / Electrically controlled, air-operated, water-cooled shutter - for absorbing beam when bombardment of material in beam area is not desired, or for timed exposures."

General Electric Electron Beam Generator Electron Tube, 1957. This electron accelerator beam tube was stored for use as spare parts for "Beam 1", the first electron beam generator produced by General Electric for the Raychem Corporation. "Beam 1" was used by the Raychem Corporation in Menlo Park, California, and later by Tyco Electronics when it bought Raychem in 1999. It was the first electron beam accelerator ever put into commercial use. "Beam 1" was still in operation until 2016. The appearance of the electron tube is that of a long metal cylander that extends into a ridged triangular cone. The cone connects to a titanium rectangular window at the base. Approximately 40" of the top of

Image of 2016.001.019 - Raychem Duffle Bag, 1957-1999. Oblong duffle bag is made of red nylon. Two woven black straps are sewn around the center  of the bag with black and white thread. The straps form a loop which becomes handles. Handle ends of the straps are folded over and sewn. Sewn onto the back handle is a leather rectangle. The leather rectangle has two sets of brass colored snaps which, when snapped together make the leather a tube. Each end of the bag has black woven straps sewn on to create two more smaller handles. Plastic zipper is black and sewn on with red thread. The zipper pull is a silvery metal. At the ends of the zipper, black nylon loops are sewn on. Attached to the loops are metal rings 1 1/2 inches in diameter. The front of the bag has white lettering printed on it.

2016.001.019 - Raychem Duffle Bag, 1957-1999. Oblong duffle bag is made of red nylon. Two woven black straps are sewn around the center of the bag with black and white thread. The straps form a loop which becomes handles. Handle ends of the straps are folded over and sewn. Sewn onto the back handle is a leather rectangle. The leather rectangle has two sets of brass colored snaps which, when snapped together make the leather a tube. Each end of the bag has black woven straps sewn on to create two more smaller handles. Plastic zipper is black and sewn on with red thread. The zipper pull is a silvery metal. At the ends of the zipper, black nylon loops are sewn on. Attached to the loops are metal rings 1 1/2 inches in diameter. The front of the bag has white lettering printed on it.

Raychem Duffle Bag, 1957-1999. Oblong duffle bag is made of red nylon. Two woven black straps are sewn around the center of the bag with black and white thread. The straps form a loop which becomes handles. Handle ends of the straps are folded over and sewn. Sewn onto the back handle is a leather rectangle. The leather rectangle has two sets of brass colored snaps which, when snapped together make the leather a tube. Each end of the bag has black woven straps sewn on to create two more smaller handles. Plastic zipper is black and sewn on with red thread. The zipper pull is a silvery metal. At the ends of the zipper, black nylon loops are sewn on. Attached to the loops are metal rings 1 1/2 i

Image of 2015.012.002 - General Electric Electron Beam Generator Electron Tube, 1957. This electron accelerator beam tube was stored for use as spare parts for "Beam 1", the first electron beam generator produced by General Electric for the Raychem Corporation. "Beam 1" was used by the Raychem Corporation in Menlo Park, California, and later by Tyco Electronics when it bought Raychem in 1999. It was the first electron beam accelerator ever put into commercial use. "Beam 1" was still in operation until 2016.

The appearance of the electron tube is that of a long metal cylinder that extends into a ridged triangular cone. The cone connects to a rectangular titanium window at the base. Approximately 40" of the top of the tube is constructed with a cylindrical piece of translucent material with 11 equally spaced black enamel metal rings. The ridged triangular section near the base is 35" long and 19" wide. Additional hardware is attached near the middle of the tube and to the side of the triangular section.

An excerpt from General Electric Product Data Sheet A4610, August 1959 describes the Electron Tube. This datasheet is for a slightly later model that is of similar design to this artifact:
"ELECTRON TUBE - Permanently evacuated; multi-section construction. Electron beam emitted by hot tungsten filament; biased grid allows tube to conduct only during high-energy portion of input cycle. Electrons accelerated by voltage applied to intermediate electrodes…emerge through permanent window to treatment area.  /  Tube Window - 3 x 15". Made of titanium, 0.0075" thick. Cooled by forced air. Air-cooling nozzle included. (Compressor must be purchased seperately...must meet specifications appearing under AIR REQUIREMENTS-TUBE WINDOW  COOLING.)  /  Electrically controlled, air-operated, water-cooled shutter - for absorbing beam when bombardment of material in beam area is not desired, or for timed exposures."

2015.012.002 - General Electric Electron Beam Generator Electron Tube, 1957. This electron accelerator beam tube was stored for use as spare parts for "Beam 1", the first electron beam generator produced by General Electric for the Raychem Corporation. "Beam 1" was used by the Raychem Corporation in Menlo Park, California, and later by Tyco Electronics when it bought Raychem in 1999. It was the first electron beam accelerator ever put into commercial use. "Beam 1" was still in operation until 2016. The appearance of the electron tube is that of a long metal cylinder that extends into a ridged triangular cone. The cone connects to a rectangular titanium window at the base. Approximately 40" of the top of the tube is constructed with a cylindrical piece of translucent material with 11 equally spaced black enamel metal rings. The ridged triangular section near the base is 35" long and 19" wide. Additional hardware is attached near the middle of the tube and to the side of the triangular section. An excerpt from General Electric Product Data Sheet A4610, August 1959 describes the Electron Tube. This datasheet is for a slightly later model that is of similar design to this artifact: "ELECTRON TUBE - Permanently evacuated; multi-section construction. Electron beam emitted by hot tungsten filament; biased grid allows tube to conduct only during high-energy portion of input cycle. Electrons accelerated by voltage applied to intermediate electrodes…emerge through permanent window to treatment area. / Tube Window - 3 x 15". Made of titanium, 0.0075" thick. Cooled by forced air. Air-cooling nozzle included. (Compressor must be purchased seperately...must meet specifications appearing under AIR REQUIREMENTS-TUBE WINDOW COOLING.) / Electrically controlled, air-operated, water-cooled shutter - for absorbing beam when bombardment of material in beam area is not desired, or for timed exposures."

General Electric Electron Beam Generator Electron Tube, 1957. This electron accelerator beam tube was stored for use as spare parts for "Beam 1", the first electron beam generator produced by General Electric for the Raychem Corporation. "Beam 1" was used by the Raychem Corporation in Menlo Park, California, and later by Tyco Electronics when it bought Raychem in 1999. It was the first electron beam accelerator ever put into commercial use. "Beam 1" was still in operation until 2016. The appearance of the electron tube is that of a long metal cylinder that extends into a ridged triangular cone. The cone connects to a rectangular titanium window at the base. Approximately 40" of the top of

Image of 2015.013.001 - Model of Paleoparadoxia created by Dr. Charles A. Repenning, Vertebrate Paleontologist and Marine Mammal Specialist for the USGS, 1966.  Ceramic model is created at 1:12 scale where 1 inch equals one foot.  Base is a round circle covered with hardened sand from which the animal is mounted in the center surrounded by four green plastic grass clumps.  Hippo-like creature is painted brown, has a large head with very small ears, blunt teeth that project slightly forward, a small nub of a tail and flipper-like front and back feet.  The front feet are bent toward the back as if the creature is resting on the front of his wrists or the back of his "hands."  According to a label previously displayed at SLAC, "The model of the animal is based on the shapes of the preserved bones, in conjunction with our knowledge of the anatomy of similar animals alive today.  Such restorations are necessarily somewhat conjectural.  Dr. Charles A. Repenning, a vertebrate paleontologist and marine mammal specialist working for the US Geological Survey, created the restoration from his detailed studies of the fossil skeleton.  The back-handed rest position emphasizes the distinctive feature of the Paleoparadoxia wrist joint.  A bony flange at the end of the lower limb bone extends down, preventing the forepaw from swinging up in the forward direction.  This flange prevented the animal from standing "plantigrade" (standing with its weight on the flat of the foot); it could only stand on its toes.  This feature was actually an adaptation for swimming and tells us that these animals used their front limbs for the downward power stroke, which pushed the animal through the water.  The foot could not flip up while pushing through the water, but could fold back for the return stroke."

2015.013.001 - Model of Paleoparadoxia created by Dr. Charles A. Repenning, Vertebrate Paleontologist and Marine Mammal Specialist for the USGS, 1966. Ceramic model is created at 1:12 scale where 1 inch equals one foot. Base is a round circle covered with hardened sand from which the animal is mounted in the center surrounded by four green plastic grass clumps. Hippo-like creature is painted brown, has a large head with very small ears, blunt teeth that project slightly forward, a small nub of a tail and flipper-like front and back feet. The front feet are bent toward the back as if the creature is resting on the front of his wrists or the back of his "hands." According to a label previously displayed at SLAC, "The model of the animal is based on the shapes of the preserved bones, in conjunction with our knowledge of the anatomy of similar animals alive today. Such restorations are necessarily somewhat conjectural. Dr. Charles A. Repenning, a vertebrate paleontologist and marine mammal specialist working for the US Geological Survey, created the restoration from his detailed studies of the fossil skeleton. The back-handed rest position emphasizes the distinctive feature of the Paleoparadoxia wrist joint. A bony flange at the end of the lower limb bone extends down, preventing the forepaw from swinging up in the forward direction. This flange prevented the animal from standing "plantigrade" (standing with its weight on the flat of the foot); it could only stand on its toes. This feature was actually an adaptation for swimming and tells us that these animals used their front limbs for the downward power stroke, which pushed the animal through the water. The foot could not flip up while pushing through the water, but could fold back for the return stroke."

Model of Paleoparadoxia created by Dr. Charles A. Repenning, Vertebrate Paleontologist and Marine Mammal Specialist for the USGS, 1966. Ceramic model is created at 1:12 scale where 1 inch equals one foot. Base is a round circle covered with hardened sand from which the animal is mounted in the center surrounded by four green plastic grass clumps. Hippo-like creature is painted brown, has a large head with very small ears, blunt teeth that project slightly forward, a small nub of a tail and flipper-like front and back feet. The front feet are bent toward the back as if the creature is resting on the front of his wrists or the back of his "hands." According to a label previously displayed

Image of 2016.001.020A-B - Chemelex Patches, c. 1969-1999. Two white rectangularly patches with rounded edges. Thicker, outer stitching is also white. "CHEMELEX" is embroidered with blue thread in patch's center. Back of patch has appliqué coating. One patch has thread ends taped down with small piece of masking tape.

2016.001.020A-B - Chemelex Patches, c. 1969-1999. Two white rectangularly patches with rounded edges. Thicker, outer stitching is also white. "CHEMELEX" is embroidered with blue thread in patch's center. Back of patch has appliqué coating. One patch has thread ends taped down with small piece of masking tape.

Chemelex Patches, c. 1969-1999. Two white rectangularly patches with rounded edges. Thicker, outer stitching is also white. "CHEMELEX" is embroidered with blue thread in patch's center. Back of patch has appliqué coating. One patch has thread ends taped down with small piece of masking tape.

Image of 2016.001.021 - Raychem Boxcutter, c. 1957-1999. Twenty-one red box cutters. The red plastic body is rectangular in shape with one end tapering slightly. The plastic is textured in a wood grain-like pattern. On one side "Raychem" is pressed into the plastic and painted black. The upper right corner of the body is molded into a plastic circle in which a metal arm is attached. Mounted in the arm is a metal blade shaped like a rhomboid. The arm and blade fold back into the red plastic body.

2016.001.021 - Raychem Boxcutter, c. 1957-1999. Twenty-one red box cutters. The red plastic body is rectangular in shape with one end tapering slightly. The plastic is textured in a wood grain-like pattern. On one side "Raychem" is pressed into the plastic and painted black. The upper right corner of the body is molded into a plastic circle in which a metal arm is attached. Mounted in the arm is a metal blade shaped like a rhomboid. The arm and blade fold back into the red plastic body.

Raychem Boxcutter, c. 1957-1999. Twenty-one red box cutters. The red plastic body is rectangular in shape with one end tapering slightly. The plastic is textured in a wood grain-like pattern. On one side "Raychem" is pressed into the plastic and painted black. The upper right corner of the body is molded into a plastic circle in which a metal arm is attached. Mounted in the arm is a metal blade shaped like a rhomboid. The arm and blade fold back into the red plastic body.

Image of 2016.001.001 - Raychem Magic Shape-memory Alloy (SMA) Club, c. 1957-1999.  A thin, gray metal alloy wire. The metal alloy is Tinel which is a combination of nickel and titanium. One end of the wire is bent in the shape of a club. Club shape consists of three bulbs and a square-shaped end. From the square end, the wire continues two inches with a slight curve. The wire is kept in a small, flat plastic bag. Inside the package, is a white card with writing in black and red ink. Top, front of the card reads "Raychem" in white writing on a red rectangle. Below that is the product name and description in black ink. The back of the card describes in black ink how the product works: "Raychem's Tinel TM Club wire  /  uses the magic of shape  /  memory alloys to remember  /  its shape no matter how you  /  bend it!"

2016.001.001 - Raychem Magic Shape-memory Alloy (SMA) Club, c. 1957-1999. A thin, gray metal alloy wire. The metal alloy is Tinel which is a combination of nickel and titanium. One end of the wire is bent in the shape of a club. Club shape consists of three bulbs and a square-shaped end. From the square end, the wire continues two inches with a slight curve. The wire is kept in a small, flat plastic bag. Inside the package, is a white card with writing in black and red ink. Top, front of the card reads "Raychem" in white writing on a red rectangle. Below that is the product name and description in black ink. The back of the card describes in black ink how the product works: "Raychem's Tinel TM Club wire / uses the magic of shape / memory alloys to remember / its shape no matter how you / bend it!"

Raychem Magic Shape-memory Alloy (SMA) Club, c. 1957-1999. A thin, gray metal alloy wire. The metal alloy is Tinel which is a combination of nickel and titanium. One end of the wire is bent in the shape of a club. Club shape consists of three bulbs and a square-shaped end. From the square end, the wire continues two inches with a slight curve. The wire is kept in a small, flat plastic bag. Inside the package, is a white card with writing in black and red ink. Top, front of the card reads "Raychem" in white writing on a red rectangle. Below that is the product name and description in black ink. The back of the card describes in black ink how the product works: "Raychem's Tinel TM Club wire /

Image of 2016.001.002A-B - Dinosaur "A Strange Change Toy" Capsules, late 1960s to 1970s. Thirty-five lime green "time capsule" pieces made of irradiated plastic produced by the Raychem Corporation as part of "A Strange Change Toy Featuring the Lost World." The toy set was sold by Mattel, Inc., and also included a machine with a heated dome and a compressor device, tweezers, instructions, a 3-D molded plastic "Lost World Landscape," and an illustrated map. The square capsules expand into toy figures when heated. They can also be re-compressed back into squares and expanded again. The dinosaur figure (a) has four limbs with three toes on each foot and a curved tail. On the dinosaur's back is a fin, which is dented towards the head. On the left side of the head is an eye, nostril, and slightly open mouth showing teeth. The right side of the head is smashed and only shows a vague outline of an eye and a mouth. The bottom is partially hollow from mid-head to mid-tail. Thirty-four compressed square capsules (b-ii) are embossed with Mattel's logo. The other side also has a Mattel logo and a pressed circle to the bottom left of the logo with a number embossed in the center.  The numbers range in the 60s and 70s.

2016.001.002A-B - Dinosaur "A Strange Change Toy" Capsules, late 1960s to 1970s. Thirty-five lime green "time capsule" pieces made of irradiated plastic produced by the Raychem Corporation as part of "A Strange Change Toy Featuring the Lost World." The toy set was sold by Mattel, Inc., and also included a machine with a heated dome and a compressor device, tweezers, instructions, a 3-D molded plastic "Lost World Landscape," and an illustrated map. The square capsules expand into toy figures when heated. They can also be re-compressed back into squares and expanded again. The dinosaur figure (a) has four limbs with three toes on each foot and a curved tail. On the dinosaur's back is a fin, which is dented towards the head. On the left side of the head is an eye, nostril, and slightly open mouth showing teeth. The right side of the head is smashed and only shows a vague outline of an eye and a mouth. The bottom is partially hollow from mid-head to mid-tail. Thirty-four compressed square capsules (b-ii) are embossed with Mattel's logo. The other side also has a Mattel logo and a pressed circle to the bottom left of the logo with a number embossed in the center. The numbers range in the 60s and 70s.

Dinosaur "A Strange Change Toy" Capsules, late 1960s to 1970s. Thirty-five lime green "time capsule" pieces made of irradiated plastic produced by the Raychem Corporation as part of "A Strange Change Toy Featuring the Lost World." The toy set was sold by Mattel, Inc., and also included a machine with a heated dome and a compressor device, tweezers, instructions, a 3-D molded plastic "Lost World Landscape," and an illustrated map. The square capsules expand into toy figures when heated. They can also be re-compressed back into squares and expanded again. The dinosaur figure (a) has four limbs with three toes on each foot and a curved tail. On the dinosaur's back is a fin, which is dented towar

Image of 2016.001.003A-B - Robot "A Strange Change Toy" Capsules, late 1960s to 1970s. Thirteen yellow "time capsule" pieces made of irradiated plastic produced by the Raychem Corporation as part of "A Strange Change Toy Featuring the Lost World." The toy set was sold by Mattel, Inc., and also included a machine with a heated dome and a compressor device, tweezers, instructions, a 3-D molded plastic "Lost World Landscape," and an illustrated map. The square capsules expand into toy figures when heated. They can also be re-compressed back into squares and expanded again. The robot figure (a) has a head, two arms and two legs. The head has rounded edges and hash marks pressed into the front with a circular mouth. The main portion of the head is rectangular with an oval at top and flat circles at right and left. The lower part of the right arm is shaped like a shovel and the lower part of the left arm is shaped like a mechanical claw. The square chest is embossed with undetermined design. The feet are embossed with little dots. Twelve compressed square capsules (b-m) are embossed with Mattel's logo. The other side also has a Mattel logo and a pressed circle to the bottom left of the logo with a number embossed in the center.  The numbers range in 50s, 60s and 70s.

2016.001.003A-B - Robot "A Strange Change Toy" Capsules, late 1960s to 1970s. Thirteen yellow "time capsule" pieces made of irradiated plastic produced by the Raychem Corporation as part of "A Strange Change Toy Featuring the Lost World." The toy set was sold by Mattel, Inc., and also included a machine with a heated dome and a compressor device, tweezers, instructions, a 3-D molded plastic "Lost World Landscape," and an illustrated map. The square capsules expand into toy figures when heated. They can also be re-compressed back into squares and expanded again. The robot figure (a) has a head, two arms and two legs. The head has rounded edges and hash marks pressed into the front with a circular mouth. The main portion of the head is rectangular with an oval at top and flat circles at right and left. The lower part of the right arm is shaped like a shovel and the lower part of the left arm is shaped like a mechanical claw. The square chest is embossed with undetermined design. The feet are embossed with little dots. Twelve compressed square capsules (b-m) are embossed with Mattel's logo. The other side also has a Mattel logo and a pressed circle to the bottom left of the logo with a number embossed in the center. The numbers range in 50s, 60s and 70s.

Robot "A Strange Change Toy" Capsules, late 1960s to 1970s. Thirteen yellow "time capsule" pieces made of irradiated plastic produced by the Raychem Corporation as part of "A Strange Change Toy Featuring the Lost World." The toy set was sold by Mattel, Inc., and also included a machine with a heated dome and a compressor device, tweezers, instructions, a 3-D molded plastic "Lost World Landscape," and an illustrated map. The square capsules expand into toy figures when heated. They can also be re-compressed back into squares and expanded again. The robot figure (a) has a head, two arms and two legs. The head has rounded edges and hash marks pressed into the front with a circular mouth. The mai

Image of 2016.001.004A-B - Monster "A Strange Change Toy" Capsules, late 1960s to 1970s. Twenty red "time capsule" pieces made of irradiated plastic produced by the Raychem Corporation as part of "A Strange Change Toy Featuring the Lost World." The toy set was sold by Mattel, Inc., and also included a machine with a heated dome and a compressor device, tweezers, instructions, a 3-D molded plastic "Lost World Landscape," and an illustrated map. The square capsules expand into toy figures when heated. They can also be re-compressed back into squares and expanded again. The monster figure (a) has two arms, two legs, and a head. The head has no neck and is low on the torso. The face has two eyes and an open oval mouth with two teeth. An embossed belly button can be seen right below the lower jaw. The elbows are bent and positioned near the top of the head. Each hand has three fingers. The legs are straight and each foot has three toes. The back has no detailing and is slightly concave. Nineteen compressed square capsules (b-t) are embossed with Mattel's logo. The other side also has a Mattel logo and a pressed circle to the bottom left of the logo with a number embossed in the center.  The numbers range in the 50s.

2016.001.004A-B - Monster "A Strange Change Toy" Capsules, late 1960s to 1970s. Twenty red "time capsule" pieces made of irradiated plastic produced by the Raychem Corporation as part of "A Strange Change Toy Featuring the Lost World." The toy set was sold by Mattel, Inc., and also included a machine with a heated dome and a compressor device, tweezers, instructions, a 3-D molded plastic "Lost World Landscape," and an illustrated map. The square capsules expand into toy figures when heated. They can also be re-compressed back into squares and expanded again. The monster figure (a) has two arms, two legs, and a head. The head has no neck and is low on the torso. The face has two eyes and an open oval mouth with two teeth. An embossed belly button can be seen right below the lower jaw. The elbows are bent and positioned near the top of the head. Each hand has three fingers. The legs are straight and each foot has three toes. The back has no detailing and is slightly concave. Nineteen compressed square capsules (b-t) are embossed with Mattel's logo. The other side also has a Mattel logo and a pressed circle to the bottom left of the logo with a number embossed in the center. The numbers range in the 50s.

Monster "A Strange Change Toy" Capsules, late 1960s to 1970s. Twenty red "time capsule" pieces made of irradiated plastic produced by the Raychem Corporation as part of "A Strange Change Toy Featuring the Lost World." The toy set was sold by Mattel, Inc., and also included a machine with a heated dome and a compressor device, tweezers, instructions, a 3-D molded plastic "Lost World Landscape," and an illustrated map. The square capsules expand into toy figures when heated. They can also be re-compressed back into squares and expanded again. The monster figure (a) has two arms, two legs, and a head. The head has no neck and is low on the torso. The face has two eyes and an open oval mouth with