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Name Thompson, James C. (Jim)
Notes http://www.northeastern.edu/wcc/about-us/ - 9/5/2017
Othernames Jim Thompson
Occupation Retired president of Tyco Thermal Controls, LLC, which operates as a materials science company serving both domestic and international markets. Formerly known as Raychem HTS LLC, the company was renamed Tyco Thermal Controls in 2002.

He held management positions in operations, engineering, sales and marketing, and was involved in both domestic and international arenas in 26 years with Raychem. He also served as Raychem’s vice president of the Asian sales operation, and led the product marketing and management team for Asia and the Americas.
Education Master of science in mechanical engineering from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology in 1973

Associated Records

Image of 2016.015.002.13 - Propane Pipe Sleeve Torch, 1975. Steel and brass propane torch. The cylindrical head of the torch is 5” long with a 1.5” diameter. The torch head has multiple air holes including four 3/8" diameter holes spaced equidistant around the circumference near the base. Six rows, each comprised of six 1/4 inch holes, appear down the length of the torch head and are spaced at 0.5” apart from each other around the circumference. The torch head is attached to 0.5” diameter metal tubing that is bent at a 30 degree angle a few inches below the head. After the bend, the tube extends for 10 inches where a brass valve is attached to regulate the flow of gas. A black sleeve of heat shrink plastic covers the lower 7.5" of tubing.
This torch was used by Jim Thompson during the Trans-Alaska Pipeline construction project. His role was to show workers how to correctly install Raychem Corporation products and teach quality control inspectors the criteria for correct installation. He notes that when in use, the torch was connected to a propane bottle with a regulator via a 20 foot hose to distance the flame from the gas tank. The valve at the bottom of the torch releases gas up through the pipe to a small nozzle at the head. When ignited, the flame extends approximately 6 feet long and several feet in diameter. Torches were used to repair local area damage that resulted when heated wrapped pipe sections were placed on skids to cool down, and to install heat-shrink pipe sleeves over tie-in joints.

2016.015.002.13 - Propane Pipe Sleeve Torch, 1975. Steel and brass propane torch. The cylindrical head of the torch is 5” long with a 1.5” diameter. The torch head has multiple air holes including four 3/8" diameter holes spaced equidistant around the circumference near the base. Six rows, each comprised of six 1/4 inch holes, appear down the length of the torch head and are spaced at 0.5” apart from each other around the circumference. The torch head is attached to 0.5” diameter metal tubing that is bent at a 30 degree angle a few inches below the head. After the bend, the tube extends for 10 inches where a brass valve is attached to regulate the flow of gas. A black sleeve of heat shrink plastic covers the lower 7.5" of tubing. This torch was used by Jim Thompson during the Trans-Alaska Pipeline construction project. His role was to show workers how to correctly install Raychem Corporation products and teach quality control inspectors the criteria for correct installation. He notes that when in use, the torch was connected to a propane bottle with a regulator via a 20 foot hose to distance the flame from the gas tank. The valve at the bottom of the torch releases gas up through the pipe to a small nozzle at the head. When ignited, the flame extends approximately 6 feet long and several feet in diameter. Torches were used to repair local area damage that resulted when heated wrapped pipe sections were placed on skids to cool down, and to install heat-shrink pipe sleeves over tie-in joints.

Propane Pipe Sleeve Torch, 1975. Steel and brass propane torch. The cylindrical head of the torch is 5” long with a 1.5” diameter. The torch head has multiple air holes including four 3/8" diameter holes spaced equidistant around the circumference near the base. Six rows, each comprised of six 1/4 inch holes, appear down the length of the torch head and are spaced at 0.5” apart from each other around the circumference. The torch head is attached to 0.5” diameter metal tubing that is bent at a 30 degree angle a few inches below the head. After the bend, the tube extends for 10 inches where a brass valve is attached to regulate the flow of gas. A black sleeve of heat shrink plastic covers the l

Image of 2016.015.002.12 - Cam-Hi Safety Cap, 1973. Hard hat issued to Jim Thompson while working on the Trans-Alaska Pipeline project for the Raychem Corporation in 1975.  The hard hat has a blue molded plastic outer shell with a visor that is 2.25" wide. The sides and back of the brim are upturned approximately 0.5" for catching water and taper as the sides meet the visor in front. A small tab with a hole is molded on the right and left side of the shell for attaching strings to secure the hard hat in place on one's head. A rectangular 1.25" x 4" sticker with "Raychem" in black font on a gray background is adhered on the right and left side of the shell. The left side also has an oval sticker with red and black text on a clear background that reads, "Raychem  /  PIPE PROTECTION  /  DIVISION." "Raychem" is printed in red and "Pipe Projection Division" is printed in black.  On the front of the shell, "Jim" and "Thompson" are printed in black on two clear rectangular adhesive labels. An embossed vinyl adhesive label with "THOMPSON" in white font on a black background is adhered on the back center of the shell under a red and green sticker that reads, "RAYCHEM  /  SAFETY IS NO ACCIDENT  /  MINE SPLICE KITS AND CABLE REPAIR SLEEVES." The hat has an adjustable four point suspension made with plastic, cloth, and leather. The suspension protects the head so it is not in direct contact with the plastic shell. Leather is sewn over the front half of the headband, and the band has pinlock adjustment at the back. A brown cord can be tightened or loosened to adjust the tension of the suspension crown straps. A teletemp temperature sensing label is adhered on the interior of the shell on the left side, and a white sticker with specification information is adhered on the interior at the back. "Cam-Hi Safety Cap  /  CH-69-C  /  MADE IN U.S.A." is molded into the underside of the visor above a manufacturing date code of 1973 with unknown day and month markings.

This hard hat was used by Jim Thompson during his work on the Trans-Alaska Pipeline construction project in 1975. Thompson notes that the project was defined as "hard hat" meaning one was worn at all times on the construction site. Hard hat color was used to define different types of workers, and the blue was unique to Raychem.  Temperature sensing labels, such as the one on the interior of the hat, were used by quality control engineers like Thompson for quick and dirty readings while testing pipe temperatures. After his time working on the Trans-Alaska Pipeline, Thompson used this hat again for other Raychem projects. The rectangular Raychem stickers were original to the hat when issued, but others were later additions such as the Raychem Pipe Protection sticker that was added after the division was formed in 1977.

2016.015.002.12 - Cam-Hi Safety Cap, 1973. Hard hat issued to Jim Thompson while working on the Trans-Alaska Pipeline project for the Raychem Corporation in 1975. The hard hat has a blue molded plastic outer shell with a visor that is 2.25" wide. The sides and back of the brim are upturned approximately 0.5" for catching water and taper as the sides meet the visor in front. A small tab with a hole is molded on the right and left side of the shell for attaching strings to secure the hard hat in place on one's head. A rectangular 1.25" x 4" sticker with "Raychem" in black font on a gray background is adhered on the right and left side of the shell. The left side also has an oval sticker with red and black text on a clear background that reads, "Raychem / PIPE PROTECTION / DIVISION." "Raychem" is printed in red and "Pipe Projection Division" is printed in black. On the front of the shell, "Jim" and "Thompson" are printed in black on two clear rectangular adhesive labels. An embossed vinyl adhesive label with "THOMPSON" in white font on a black background is adhered on the back center of the shell under a red and green sticker that reads, "RAYCHEM / SAFETY IS NO ACCIDENT / MINE SPLICE KITS AND CABLE REPAIR SLEEVES." The hat has an adjustable four point suspension made with plastic, cloth, and leather. The suspension protects the head so it is not in direct contact with the plastic shell. Leather is sewn over the front half of the headband, and the band has pinlock adjustment at the back. A brown cord can be tightened or loosened to adjust the tension of the suspension crown straps. A teletemp temperature sensing label is adhered on the interior of the shell on the left side, and a white sticker with specification information is adhered on the interior at the back. "Cam-Hi Safety Cap / CH-69-C / MADE IN U.S.A." is molded into the underside of the visor above a manufacturing date code of 1973 with unknown day and month markings. This hard hat was used by Jim Thompson during his work on the Trans-Alaska Pipeline construction project in 1975. Thompson notes that the project was defined as "hard hat" meaning one was worn at all times on the construction site. Hard hat color was used to define different types of workers, and the blue was unique to Raychem. Temperature sensing labels, such as the one on the interior of the hat, were used by quality control engineers like Thompson for quick and dirty readings while testing pipe temperatures. After his time working on the Trans-Alaska Pipeline, Thompson used this hat again for other Raychem projects. The rectangular Raychem stickers were original to the hat when issued, but others were later additions such as the Raychem Pipe Protection sticker that was added after the division was formed in 1977.

Cam-Hi Safety Cap, 1973. Hard hat issued to Jim Thompson while working on the Trans-Alaska Pipeline project for the Raychem Corporation in 1975. The hard hat has a blue molded plastic outer shell with a visor that is 2.25" wide. The sides and back of the brim are upturned approximately 0.5" for catching water and taper as the sides meet the visor in front. A small tab with a hole is molded on the right and left side of the shell for attaching strings to secure the hard hat in place on one's head. A rectangular 1.25" x 4" sticker with "Raychem" in black font on a gray background is adhered on the right and left side of the shell. The left side also has an oval sticker with red and black text

2016.015.002.10 - Alyeska Arctic Wear Parka, c. 1972-1975. Down parka designed and produced by the Woolrich Company for the Trans-Alaska Pipeline construction project. The outer shell is constructed with dark green heat and flame resistant nomex aramid fiber. The hood is trimmed with tawny coyote fur, and two cotton cords can be pulled to cinch the hood into a tunnel shape for protection against wind. The front of the parka has four flap patch pockets. Each pocket is secured with a single round green button. The lower pockets are 10.75” x 9” and the upper pockets are slightly smaller at 7.75” x 6.25”. The proper left top pocket also has a vertical button hole visible underneath the flap. A placket with five buttons covers a two way zipper closure. The top zipper slider has a brown leather pull attached. Olive green ribbed cuffs are sewn inside the sleeves and a rectangular brown leather patch is sewn on each elbow. Inside the parka, blue nylon lining is quilted over down insulation. A white and black rectangular label is sewn into the lining on the area of the upper back. A woven black border surrounds woven black text that reads, "ALYESKA / ARCTIC WEAR." Two small tags are sewn underneath this label. A size tag is attached at bottom center marked "L", and a tag sewn in a loop at the top right corner reads, "OUTER-SHELL-NOMEX ARAMID FIBER / LINING-100% Nylon / INSULATION-Down." There are two 8” x 6.5” interior pockets near the waistline with elastic at the top opening. A white rectangular plasticized label used for writing someone's name into the coat is sewn on the proper left interior pocket. A cotton cord is sewn into the coat to cinch the waist, and a strap with two metal rings is sewn onto the back of the parka to secure the hood down. This coat was issued to Jim Thompson after he completed safety training for the Trans-Alaska Pipeline construction project in 1975. He notes that the jacket was one piece of a set of issued clothing, including a secondary jacket worn inside the parka, insulated nomex pants with suspenders, boots with two sets of ½ inch felt liners, and wool socks. These clothes protected workers on the construction site from extreme cold temperatures, moisture, wind, and particularly for this pipeline project, fire.

Alyeska Arctic Wear Parka, c. 1972-1975. Down parka designed and produced by the Woolrich Company for the Trans-Alaska Pipeline construction project. The outer shell is constructed with dark green heat and flame resistant nomex aramid fiber. The hood is trimmed with tawny coyote fur, and two cotton cords can be pulled to cinch the hood into a tunnel shape for protection against wind. The front of the parka has four flap patch pockets. Each pocket is secured with a single round green button. The lower pockets are 10.75” x 9” and the upper pockets are slightly smaller at 7.75” x 6.25”. The proper left top pocket also has a vertical button hole visible underneath the flap. A placket with five bu

Image of 2016.015.002.11 - Three-Fingered Gloves, c. 1972-1975. Three-fingered insulated gloves manufactured by Kebek Industries for the Trans-Alaska Pipeline construction project. Green nylon makes up the top side of the gloves with a band of black synthetic fur sewn over the area covering the back of the hand. The underside of the gloves is constructed with green nylon below the wrist and cream colored leather in the area of the palm and fingers, including the entire thumb sheath. On the inner side of the thumb sheath, a 1/8” strip of leather extends past the stitching on both gloves. The gloves are filled with synthetic batting and lined in white synthetic fabric. A 2” wide piece of red synthetic fur is sewn in the interior of the gloves just below the elasticized opening. Both gloves have a 1” x 4” white label sewn over the red faux fur for writing the glove owner's name. The right glove also has a fabric tag sewn above the plasticized label. Blue text printed on the tag reads, “Kebek  /  INDUSTRIES  /  KNOXVILLE TENN.” A black “L” is printed below.
This pair of gloves was issued to Jim Thompson after he completed safety training for the Trans-Alaska Pipeline construction project. He notes that the gloves were one piece of a set of issued clothing, including an insulated parka, a secondary jacket worn underneath the parka, insulated pants with suspenders, boots with two sets of 1/2 inch felt liners, and heavy wool socks. These clothes protected workers on the construction site from extreme cold temperatures, moisture, wind, and in particular for this project, fire.

2016.015.002.11 - Three-Fingered Gloves, c. 1972-1975. Three-fingered insulated gloves manufactured by Kebek Industries for the Trans-Alaska Pipeline construction project. Green nylon makes up the top side of the gloves with a band of black synthetic fur sewn over the area covering the back of the hand. The underside of the gloves is constructed with green nylon below the wrist and cream colored leather in the area of the palm and fingers, including the entire thumb sheath. On the inner side of the thumb sheath, a 1/8” strip of leather extends past the stitching on both gloves. The gloves are filled with synthetic batting and lined in white synthetic fabric. A 2” wide piece of red synthetic fur is sewn in the interior of the gloves just below the elasticized opening. Both gloves have a 1” x 4” white label sewn over the red faux fur for writing the glove owner's name. The right glove also has a fabric tag sewn above the plasticized label. Blue text printed on the tag reads, “Kebek / INDUSTRIES / KNOXVILLE TENN.” A black “L” is printed below. This pair of gloves was issued to Jim Thompson after he completed safety training for the Trans-Alaska Pipeline construction project. He notes that the gloves were one piece of a set of issued clothing, including an insulated parka, a secondary jacket worn underneath the parka, insulated pants with suspenders, boots with two sets of 1/2 inch felt liners, and heavy wool socks. These clothes protected workers on the construction site from extreme cold temperatures, moisture, wind, and in particular for this project, fire.

Three-Fingered Gloves, c. 1972-1975. Three-fingered insulated gloves manufactured by Kebek Industries for the Trans-Alaska Pipeline construction project. Green nylon makes up the top side of the gloves with a band of black synthetic fur sewn over the area covering the back of the hand. The underside of the gloves is constructed with green nylon below the wrist and cream colored leather in the area of the palm and fingers, including the entire thumb sheath. On the inner side of the thumb sheath, a 1/8” strip of leather extends past the stitching on both gloves. The gloves are filled with synthetic batting and lined in white synthetic fabric. A 2” wide piece of red synthetic fur is sewn in the

Image of 2016.015.002.31 - Alyeska Pipeline Orientation Certificate of Completion Badge, August 4, 1975. This is a rectangular laminated blue paper badge issued to James C. Thompson for completing orientation training for the Trans-Alaska Pipeline construction project. Bold text at top center reads, "ALYESKA PIPELINE ORIENTATION  /  CERTIFICATE OF COMPLETION."  Below, information is typewritten on lines for name, date, social security number, and certificate approval. Text reads, "Name: Thompson, J.C.  /  Date: 8/4/75  /  S. S. No. [crossed out in black ink]  /  Approved By: James Kisse[lli]ng." The back side of the badge is blank.

2016.015.002.31 - Alyeska Pipeline Orientation Certificate of Completion Badge, August 4, 1975. This is a rectangular laminated blue paper badge issued to James C. Thompson for completing orientation training for the Trans-Alaska Pipeline construction project. Bold text at top center reads, "ALYESKA PIPELINE ORIENTATION / CERTIFICATE OF COMPLETION." Below, information is typewritten on lines for name, date, social security number, and certificate approval. Text reads, "Name: Thompson, J.C. / Date: 8/4/75 / S. S. No. [crossed out in black ink] / Approved By: James Kisse[lli]ng." The back side of the badge is blank.

Alyeska Pipeline Orientation Certificate of Completion Badge, August 4, 1975. This is a rectangular laminated blue paper badge issued to James C. Thompson for completing orientation training for the Trans-Alaska Pipeline construction project. Bold text at top center reads, "ALYESKA PIPELINE ORIENTATION / CERTIFICATE OF COMPLETION." Below, information is typewritten on lines for name, date, social security number, and certificate approval. Text reads, "Name: Thompson, J.C. / Date: 8/4/75 / S. S. No. [crossed out in black ink] / Approved By: James Kisse[lli]ng." The back side of the badge is blank.

Image of 2016.015.002.32 - Alyeska Pipeline Service Company Identification Badge, 1975. This is a rectangular laminated Alyeska identification badge issued to James C. Thompson for the Trans-Alaska Pipeline construction project. A color photograph of Thompson against a green and white diagonal striped background fills the upper half of the badge. Thompson has medium length brown hair and wears a light colored collared shirt and wire rim glasses. The lower half of the badge shows printed lines with information typewritten in black ink. Text reads, "CONT - CONSULT [construction consultant]  /  J C THOMPSON  /  Med Alert NONE  /  [Social Security number crossed out in black ink]  /  James C Thompson [cursive signature in blue ink]  /  Signature  /  RAYCHEM.” A large `P' in black ink on a square of pink paper is adhered to the bottom left corner, and a sticker with “Alyeska” in black ink on a clear plastic background is adhered vertically at center left over the photograph and printed information. There is a 0.125" x 0.5" hole at top center for attaching a strap. The back of the badge has a torn adhesive label with a white background and a black and red horizontal stripe at center. Partial text is visible. From top to bottom, “A [black ink]  /  WOR[illegible, printed diagonally in red ink]  /  0 [illegible, red ink]  /  0 [illegible] 19  /  [illegible, black ink] S: OCT 3 [red ink].” Thompson notes that the text on the back of the badge was likely entrance and exit stamps from the various construction camps working on the pipeline.

2016.015.002.32 - Alyeska Pipeline Service Company Identification Badge, 1975. This is a rectangular laminated Alyeska identification badge issued to James C. Thompson for the Trans-Alaska Pipeline construction project. A color photograph of Thompson against a green and white diagonal striped background fills the upper half of the badge. Thompson has medium length brown hair and wears a light colored collared shirt and wire rim glasses. The lower half of the badge shows printed lines with information typewritten in black ink. Text reads, "CONT - CONSULT [construction consultant] / J C THOMPSON / Med Alert NONE / [Social Security number crossed out in black ink] / James C Thompson [cursive signature in blue ink] / Signature / RAYCHEM.” A large `P' in black ink on a square of pink paper is adhered to the bottom left corner, and a sticker with “Alyeska” in black ink on a clear plastic background is adhered vertically at center left over the photograph and printed information. There is a 0.125" x 0.5" hole at top center for attaching a strap. The back of the badge has a torn adhesive label with a white background and a black and red horizontal stripe at center. Partial text is visible. From top to bottom, “A [black ink] / WOR[illegible, printed diagonally in red ink] / 0 [illegible, red ink] / 0 [illegible] 19 / [illegible, black ink] S: OCT 3 [red ink].” Thompson notes that the text on the back of the badge was likely entrance and exit stamps from the various construction camps working on the pipeline.

Alyeska Pipeline Service Company Identification Badge, 1975. This is a rectangular laminated Alyeska identification badge issued to James C. Thompson for the Trans-Alaska Pipeline construction project. A color photograph of Thompson against a green and white diagonal striped background fills the upper half of the badge. Thompson has medium length brown hair and wears a light colored collared shirt and wire rim glasses. The lower half of the badge shows printed lines with information typewritten in black ink. Text reads, "CONT - CONSULT [construction consultant] / J C THOMPSON / Med Alert NONE / [Social Security number crossed out in black ink] / James C Thompson [cursive signature in

Image of 2016.015.002.33 - Raychem Corporation Employee Badge, c. 1980s. This is a rectangular laminated identification badge issued to James C. Thompson. The ID consists of a white piece of paper with a 5/8“ red band across the top. The “Raychem” text logo appears in white font at top center on the red band. “JAMES THOMPSON  /  20391” is typewritten in black ink on the lower right side of the paper above a handwritten cursive signature “James C Thompson,” also in black ink. A 1.25” x 1.25” color photograph of Thompson is placed at bottom left. Thompson, who has short dark brown hair, appears from the shoulders up against a red background wearing a green plaid jacket over a white collared shirt. There is a 0.125" x 0.5" hole at top center for attaching a strap. The back side of the badge is blank.

2016.015.002.33 - Raychem Corporation Employee Badge, c. 1980s. This is a rectangular laminated identification badge issued to James C. Thompson. The ID consists of a white piece of paper with a 5/8“ red band across the top. The “Raychem” text logo appears in white font at top center on the red band. “JAMES THOMPSON / 20391” is typewritten in black ink on the lower right side of the paper above a handwritten cursive signature “James C Thompson,” also in black ink. A 1.25” x 1.25” color photograph of Thompson is placed at bottom left. Thompson, who has short dark brown hair, appears from the shoulders up against a red background wearing a green plaid jacket over a white collared shirt. There is a 0.125" x 0.5" hole at top center for attaching a strap. The back side of the badge is blank.

Raychem Corporation Employee Badge, c. 1980s. This is a rectangular laminated identification badge issued to James C. Thompson. The ID consists of a white piece of paper with a 5/8“ red band across the top. The “Raychem” text logo appears in white font at top center on the red band. “JAMES THOMPSON / 20391” is typewritten in black ink on the lower right side of the paper above a handwritten cursive signature “James C Thompson,” also in black ink. A 1.25” x 1.25” color photograph of Thompson is placed at bottom left. Thompson, who has short dark brown hair, appears from the shoulders up against a red background wearing a green plaid jacket over a white collared shirt. There is a 0.125" x 0.5

Image of 2016.015.002.34 - Raychem ShrinkSystems Kit, c. 1985-1990. This is a Raychem Corporation ShrinkSystems kit encased in clear plastic. The kit contains a paper brochure, a piece of wraparound heat shrink tubing, a perforated metal sleeve for connecting the tubing, two plastic cable ties, and what appears to be black electrical tape for holding a cable splice in place. The black wraparound tubing is held together with a tan rubber band, and the rest of the items are loose within the clear plastic bag. The brochure's front cover contains color photographs and text against a gray background. “Raychem ShrinkSystems  /  HEAVY-DUTY HEAT-SHRINKABLE PRODUCTS” is printed vertically along the left margin. “Raychem” appears in red and the rest of the text is black. Text at top reads, “Solve All Your  /  Insulating, Sealing and  /  Repair Problems.” Two small color images of a person heating wraparound tubing appear below the text, and a large color image of a heat torch shrinking tubing over a pipe fills the lower three-quarters of the page.
 
Jim Thompson notes that the kits were commercial products sold to electricians through electrical distribution centers and not designed for a specific client. The wraparound heat shrink tubing is constructed with a rectangular piece of irradiated plastic that has a hooked channel on each side. The two sides are secured together around an existing pipe by sliding a perforated metal sleeve over the two channels. This is called a “rail and channel” closure. Markings on the tubing indicate the appropriate main and tap cable sizes for use with the product. The concept of wraparound tubing became the basis of thousands of Raychem products.
For a repair, an electrician would start by stripping off a section from the main cable. Wire would be added and secured with cable ties. White release paper on the inside of the wraparound tubing would be pulled off exposing adhesive to help the material stay in place as the two sides were brought together and secured with the metal sleeve. A torch was applied to shrink the tubing first at the center and slowly moving to one end and then the other. Adhesive inside the wraparound would melt and provide a water proof seal and electrical insulation.

2016.015.002.34 - Raychem ShrinkSystems Kit, c. 1985-1990. This is a Raychem Corporation ShrinkSystems kit encased in clear plastic. The kit contains a paper brochure, a piece of wraparound heat shrink tubing, a perforated metal sleeve for connecting the tubing, two plastic cable ties, and what appears to be black electrical tape for holding a cable splice in place. The black wraparound tubing is held together with a tan rubber band, and the rest of the items are loose within the clear plastic bag. The brochure's front cover contains color photographs and text against a gray background. “Raychem ShrinkSystems / HEAVY-DUTY HEAT-SHRINKABLE PRODUCTS” is printed vertically along the left margin. “Raychem” appears in red and the rest of the text is black. Text at top reads, “Solve All Your / Insulating, Sealing and / Repair Problems.” Two small color images of a person heating wraparound tubing appear below the text, and a large color image of a heat torch shrinking tubing over a pipe fills the lower three-quarters of the page. Jim Thompson notes that the kits were commercial products sold to electricians through electrical distribution centers and not designed for a specific client. The wraparound heat shrink tubing is constructed with a rectangular piece of irradiated plastic that has a hooked channel on each side. The two sides are secured together around an existing pipe by sliding a perforated metal sleeve over the two channels. This is called a “rail and channel” closure. Markings on the tubing indicate the appropriate main and tap cable sizes for use with the product. The concept of wraparound tubing became the basis of thousands of Raychem products. For a repair, an electrician would start by stripping off a section from the main cable. Wire would be added and secured with cable ties. White release paper on the inside of the wraparound tubing would be pulled off exposing adhesive to help the material stay in place as the two sides were brought together and secured with the metal sleeve. A torch was applied to shrink the tubing first at the center and slowly moving to one end and then the other. Adhesive inside the wraparound would melt and provide a water proof seal and electrical insulation.

Raychem ShrinkSystems Kit, c. 1985-1990. This is a Raychem Corporation ShrinkSystems kit encased in clear plastic. The kit contains a paper brochure, a piece of wraparound heat shrink tubing, a perforated metal sleeve for connecting the tubing, two plastic cable ties, and what appears to be black electrical tape for holding a cable splice in place. The black wraparound tubing is held together with a tan rubber band, and the rest of the items are loose within the clear plastic bag. The brochure's front cover contains color photographs and text against a gray background. “Raychem ShrinkSystems / HEAVY-DUTY HEAT-SHRINKABLE PRODUCTS” is printed vertically along the left margin. “Raychem” appear

Image of 2016.015.002.6 - Raychem Five Year Service Award, 1979.  Commemorative sculpture given to employees for five years of service working at the Raychem Corporation. The sculpture has a medium brown wood block base that is 2.25" x 1.5" x 1.5". A silver colored cylindrical metal tube with a diameter of 0.75" extends 3.5" up from the base. The back of the tube is cut off at a 60 degree downward slope, and the front side is cut out in a shallow vertical 'V' shape. The interior of the tube is painted blue. A three-dimensional red and silver Beta and Gamma Raychem logo is attached with a small rod to the back, giving the appearance that it is "floating" in the center of the tube. A 3/8" x 3/8" silver colored metal square inscribed with "5" is inlaid into the wooden base on the front right corner. A 0.25" x 1.5" x 0.25" metal piece inscribed with "James C. Thompson" is inlaid in the back side of the wooden base near the bottom. This style of award was nicknamed the apple corer by Raychem staff.

2016.015.002.6 - Raychem Five Year Service Award, 1979. Commemorative sculpture given to employees for five years of service working at the Raychem Corporation. The sculpture has a medium brown wood block base that is 2.25" x 1.5" x 1.5". A silver colored cylindrical metal tube with a diameter of 0.75" extends 3.5" up from the base. The back of the tube is cut off at a 60 degree downward slope, and the front side is cut out in a shallow vertical 'V' shape. The interior of the tube is painted blue. A three-dimensional red and silver Beta and Gamma Raychem logo is attached with a small rod to the back, giving the appearance that it is "floating" in the center of the tube. A 3/8" x 3/8" silver colored metal square inscribed with "5" is inlaid into the wooden base on the front right corner. A 0.25" x 1.5" x 0.25" metal piece inscribed with "James C. Thompson" is inlaid in the back side of the wooden base near the bottom. This style of award was nicknamed the apple corer by Raychem staff.

Raychem Five Year Service Award, 1979. Commemorative sculpture given to employees for five years of service working at the Raychem Corporation. The sculpture has a medium brown wood block base that is 2.25" x 1.5" x 1.5". A silver colored cylindrical metal tube with a diameter of 0.75" extends 3.5" up from the base. The back of the tube is cut off at a 60 degree downward slope, and the front side is cut out in a shallow vertical 'V' shape. The interior of the tube is painted blue. A three-dimensional red and silver Beta and Gamma Raychem logo is attached with a small rod to the back, giving the appearance that it is "floating" in the center of the tube. A 3/8" x 3/8" silver colored metal squ

Image of 2016.015.002.8 - Raychem Service Award Lapel Pin with Ruby Stone, c. 1974-1999. Cast gold plated pin made by O. C. Tanner and given to Raychem employees after a certain number of years working with the company.  The pin has an overall rectangular shape with a polished surface. "Raychem" appears within a rectangular area with a diamond background pattern that is aligned at top left. The patterned area fills almost the full width and slightly more than half the height of the pin's surface. A pinhead-size ruby stone is set into the surface and is centered below the patterned area. A circular polished gold spring-loaded clutch holds the pin in place. A casting mark is stamped into the pin back. Original box is an accessory to the object.

2016.015.002.8 - Raychem Service Award Lapel Pin with Ruby Stone, c. 1974-1999. Cast gold plated pin made by O. C. Tanner and given to Raychem employees after a certain number of years working with the company. The pin has an overall rectangular shape with a polished surface. "Raychem" appears within a rectangular area with a diamond background pattern that is aligned at top left. The patterned area fills almost the full width and slightly more than half the height of the pin's surface. A pinhead-size ruby stone is set into the surface and is centered below the patterned area. A circular polished gold spring-loaded clutch holds the pin in place. A casting mark is stamped into the pin back. Original box is an accessory to the object.

Raychem Service Award Lapel Pin with Ruby Stone, c. 1974-1999. Cast gold plated pin made by O. C. Tanner and given to Raychem employees after a certain number of years working with the company. The pin has an overall rectangular shape with a polished surface. "Raychem" appears within a rectangular area with a diamond background pattern that is aligned at top left. The patterned area fills almost the full width and slightly more than half the height of the pin's surface. A pinhead-size ruby stone is set into the surface and is centered below the patterned area. A circular polished gold spring-loaded clutch holds the pin in place. A casting mark is stamped into the pin back. Original box is an

Image of 2016.015.001.159 - Raychem Corporation Photo Library Album, Personnel General Volume VI, 1983-1985

2016.015.001.159 - Raychem Corporation Photo Library Album, Personnel General Volume VI, 1983-1985

Raychem Corporation Photo Library Album, Personnel General Volume VI, 1983-1985. Album of photographs compiled by the Raychem Corporation shows black and white contact sheets with images of company personnel. The contact sheets are 10" x 8" and show both 120 and 35mm size film. Adhesive labels on each page are marked with the negative number, date, and title of the images. There are 41 album pages in this volume, 2016.15.1.159.1-.41. A PDF document with all images is available in the collections database media tab.